Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a div which contains many divs. All of these subdivs have a number of classes that match a certain naming pattern. I have many classes named like "tile1Full","tile1Thumb","BG1Full","BG1Thumb". So my html might look like this:

<div id=parent>
    <div>
        <div class='tile1Full BG2Full border1'>
    </div>
    <div>
        <div class='tile3ContainerFull border1'>
            <div class=tile2x2Full border3></div>
        </div>
    </div>

I would like to replace all classes that have "Full" in the name with their "Thumb" counterpart, so the result would be this:

<div id=parent>
    <div>
        <div class='tile1Thumb BG2Thumb border1'>
    </div>
    <div>
        <div class='tile3ContainerThumb border1'>
        <div class=tile2x2Thumb border3></div>
    </div>
</div>

Here is what I came up with:

contents.find('div').each(function (i) {
    if ($(this).attr('class')!==undefined)
    {
        $(this).attr('class',$(this).attr('class').replace(/Full/g,'Thumb'));
    }
});

The problem is, according to Firefox "Inspect Element", when I look at the class attribute, the new class names are there. However, when I look at the CSS inspector, those classes are not actually being applied. It no longer applies the "Full" classes, as expected, but it does not apply the "Thumb" classes either.

One of the things the class does is set the width and height of the div. The divs themselves contain no content; just background images, so since the new classes are not being applied, they all have widths and heights of 0 and in effect disappear.

Why would the attribute inspector report that they have the desired class, but then the CSS inspector shows that those classes are not being applied?

Thanks

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

you can do it like this

$(document.body).find('div').each(function (i) {
    var c = $(this).attr('class');
    if(c !== undefined){
        c = c.replace(/Full/g,'Thumb')
        $(this).removeClass().addClass(c);
    }
});

see here http://jsfiddle.net/95tQA/1/

share|improve this answer
    
I would extend it a little so that only the "Full*" class gets removed. –  Florian Loch Nov 10 '13 at 22:53
    
@FlorianLoch I don't understand? this will just replace Full with Thumb through all classes on the div –  rorypicko Nov 10 '13 at 22:55
    
This is perfect. Thanks! –  chiliNUT Nov 10 '13 at 23:06
    
@RoryPicko92 Sorry, seems it was to late this morning... You are absolutely right. –  Florian Loch Nov 11 '13 at 10:21

I think you can get it working using heavy use of this part of .attr(attr, fn). I haven't had a chance to test it, set up a fiddle and I'll get it working but try:

contents.find('div').attr("class", function (idx, cls) {
    if(/Full/.test(cls) {
        return cls.replace(/Full/g, 'Thumb');
    }
});

Quick test:

var $a = $("<div>", {"class": "test bgFull yo test2"});
$a.attr("class", function (idx, cls) {
    return cls.replace(/Full/g, 'Thumb');
});
$a.attr("class"); // 'test bgThumb yo test2'
share|improve this answer
    
I get "cls is undefined," perhaps because it gets messed up when operating on an element with no class attribute? –  chiliNUT Nov 10 '13 at 23:06
    
@chiliNUT good point, probably better to test if the Full is contained first anyway so jQuery does less work –  megawac Nov 10 '13 at 23:09
    
yeah. actually that edit serves both a)checking that it has a class attribute and b)checking if it contains Full. Also, changing the selector from 'div' to 'div [class]' removes the need to check if the class attribute is undefined. I'm going to integrate that and your .test check into RoryPicko's solution for my final code. Thanks! –  chiliNUT Nov 10 '13 at 23:16
    
oh and btw you need an extra closing parens after that if statement –  chiliNUT Nov 10 '13 at 23:17

This is propaply some thing of internal propagation method that goes wrong here... Did you try using the jQuery function addClass() and removeClass()? This would propaply look cleaner to.

Cheers,
Florian

share|improve this answer
    
I didn't use addClass removeClass because there are about 20 different classes of each type and I didn't want to have to specify each one. If you have a solution where I can use pattern matching with addClass removeClass that would be ideal –  chiliNUT Nov 10 '13 at 22:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.