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I have a list of tuples, with nested tuples and lists, that looks like the list bellow:

 a= [('Maria', [1, [2, {'teste': (2, 1.0)}]]), 
('Lisa ', [2, [4, {'field': (4, 0.75), 'bola': (4, 0.25)}]]), 
('John ', [4, [5, {'engine': (5, 0.2), 'wheel': (5, 0.4), 'wheels': (5, 0.2)}]]),
 ('Tracy ', [4, [6, {'pizza': (6, 0.16), 'fish': (6, 0.1), 'animals': (6, 0.1)}]])]

I want to flat out this list to look like:

a.modified = ('Maria', 1, 2, {'teste': (2, 1.0)}]]), 
('Lisa ', 2, 4, {'field': (4, 0.75), 'bola': (4, 0.25)}]]), 
('John ', 4, 5, {'engine': (5, 0.2), 'wheel': (5, 0.4), 'wheels': (5, 0.2)}]]), 
('Tracy ', 4, 6, {'pizza': (6, 0.16), 'fish': (6, 0.1), 'animals': (6, 0.1}]])])

I have tried doing it step by step, using:

a2=[item for sublist in a for item in sublist]

and

a2 = list(itertools.chain.from_iterable(a))

and also:

a2 = list(item for sublist in a for item in sublist)

Nothing seems to work. I know this is too basic, but any tips on how to solve this would be really helpful. Thanks!

share|improve this question
2  
Could you fix the syntax errors in your code? Neither what you have nor what you want are copy-'n-pastable. – DSM Nov 11 '13 at 1:04
    
Fixed, thank you for the heads up! – user2962024 Nov 11 '13 at 1:16
    
? You have tuples closed by }, you have {, which is always invalid, etc. Until you can copy exactly what you've posted and paste it into a fresh interpreter, it's not fixed. (For that reason, a.modified should probably be a_modified, too.) – DSM Nov 11 '13 at 1:22
    
@DSM No, what I have are dictionaries nested deep inside the tuples, that's what the {}s are doing there. This {'field': (4, 0.75), 'bola': (4, 0.25)} is a dictionary inside the nested tuples. That's why it is so complicated. – user2962024 Nov 11 '13 at 1:34
    
Good grief. Look at 'animals': (6, 0.1}]])] -- you don't close the tuple starting with (6 with ). And look at {, 'engine': (5, 0.2), [etc] -- that {, is syntactically invalid. You can easily see the problem simply by doing what I recommended, copying and pasting your own code, and noting the SyntaxError; that you didn't bother is disappointing. If you can't be bothered to make it straightforward for people to help you, you'll find far fewer people will be willing to. – DSM Nov 11 '13 at 1:41
up vote 2 down vote accepted

So it appears you have a list of tuples and linked-list-like structures. Whenever operating on linked-lists, you should think, recursion.

def flatten(items):
    from itertools import chain
    def flatten_link(link):
        if isinstance(link, list):
            yield link[0]
            for item in flatten_link(link[1]):
                yield item
        elif link is not None:
            yield link
    return list(tuple(chain(item[:1], flatten_link(item[1]))) for item in items)

a = [
    ('Maria', [1, [2, {'teste': (2, 1.0)}]]),
    ('Lisa ', [2, [4, {'field': (4, 0.75), 'bola': (4, 0.25)}]]), 
    ('John ', [4, [5, {'engine': (5, 0.2), 'wheel': (5, 0.4), 'wheels': (5, 0.2)}]]),
    ('Tracy', [4, [6, {'pizza': (6, 0.16), 'fish': (6, 0.1), 'animals': (6, 0.1)}]]),
]
print(flatten(a))

Which yields:

[
    ('Maria', 1, 2, {'teste': (2, 1.0)}),
    ('Lisa ', 2, 4, {'bola': (4, 0.25), 'field': (4, 0.75)}),
    ('John ', 4, 5, {'engine': (5, 0.2), 'wheel': (5, 0.4), 'wheels': (5, 0.2)}),
    ('Tracy', 4, 6, {'fish': (6, 0.1), 'animals': (6, 0.1), 'pizza': (6, 0.16)})
]
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much, Jeff! That was exactly right! And so clever! :) – user2962024 Nov 11 '13 at 1:51

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