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Suppose I have a simple abstract BinaryTree with subclasses Node and Leaf and I want to write a function that produces a List[Leaf].

def getLeaves(tree: BinaryTree): List[Leaf] =
    tree match {
      case Leaf(v) => List(tree.asInstanceOf[Leaf])
      case Node(left, right) => getLeaves(left) ++ getLeaves(right)
    }

Is there a way to avoid the explicit asInstanceOf[Leaf] cast in the Leaf case? If I leave it out I get a diagnostic saying: found: BinaryTree; required Leaf.

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Another big problem is, that for large trees this code will produce stack overflows. You should either make it tail recursive, or iterate over the tree to create the list. –  drexin Nov 11 '13 at 7:24

3 Answers 3

I saw this construct used elsewhere. It seems to do the job.

def getLeaves(tree: BinaryTree): List[Leaf] =
    tree match {
      case leaf: Leaf => List(leaf)
      case Node(left, right) => getLeaves(left) ++ getLeaves(right)
    }
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Try this way

def getLeaves(tree: BinaryTree): List[Leaf] =
    tree match {
      case x@Leaf(v) => List(x)
      case Node(left, right) => getLeaves(left) ++ getLeaves(right)
    }

Also note, that your implementation is bad performance-wise, as you're creating a new list in every Node.

it can be fixed this way

def genLeaves(tree:BinaryTree) = {
  def getLeaves0(tree: BinaryTree, acc:List[Leaf]): List[Leaf] =
    tree match {
      case x@Leaf(v) => x::acc
      case Node(left, right) => {
         val leftLeaves = getLeaves(left, acc)
         getLeaves(right, leftLeaves)
         }
    }
  getLeaves0(tree).reverse
}

Here' you'll reuse all already collected items and you'll have only a single list allocated during traversal. You're collecting elements in it as you traverse them, so you'll end up with Leaves in reverse order(List works as LIFO), so to get elements in order how you visited it, we need to reverse resulting list.

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I agree that the accumulator approach is better. I was trying to get at the issue of casting. –  RussAbbott Nov 11 '13 at 3:54
    
as v is not used in RHS of case x@Leaf(v) => List(x), i tend to prefer the simpler case leaf: Leaf => List(leaf) –  Yann Moisan Nov 11 '13 at 9:21

You can utilize the fact that you have already deconstructed tree to Leaf(v), and rebuild the leaf:

def getLeaves(tree: BinaryTree): List[Leaf] =
    tree match {
        case Leaf(v) => List(Leav(v))
        case Node(left, right) => getLeaves(left) ++ getLeaves(right)
    }
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I agree that this works. The problem I have with it is that it requires that a new Leaf be built for each existing Leaf. It would be so much nicer if one could simply use the object one has since one knows its a Leaf. –  RussAbbott Nov 11 '13 at 3:56

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