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I've trimmed this down so the problem still comes up. I'll be able to get away with what I've created for my assignment, however, the memory management is causing some problems. If I run this code as I've copied it, it gets hung up when it goes to the overloaded << function.

I believe that i've completed the memory allocation correctly, according to What is the right way to allocate memory in the C++ constructor?. I can't tell where the error is coming from.

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
using namespace std;

class Poly
{
private:
int order; //order of the polynomial
int size; //order + 1
int * coeff;//pointer to array of coeff on the heap

public:
    Poly();
    Poly(int Order);
    Poly(int Order, int * Coeff);
    ~Poly(){delete [] coeff; cout << "Destructor\n";};
    Poly(const Poly &rhs);

//accessors &  mutators
    void set(int * Coeff, int Order);

//Overloaded Operators
    Poly operator+(const Poly &rhs);
    Poly & operator=(const Poly &rhs);
    friend ostream & operator<<(ostream & Out, const Poly &rhs);
};

int main()
{
    int coeff1[ ] =  {-38,2,-24,6,4};
    int coeff2[ ] = {-38,2,-14,0,0,10,0,4};
    int size;

    bool flag;

    Poly P1(4, coeff1);
    Poly P2(7, coeff2);
    Poly P3;
    P3 = P1 + P2;
    cout << "P1 + P2: " << P3;

    return 0;
}
Poly::Poly()
{
    order = 0;
    size = order + 1;
    coeff = new int[size];
    coeff[0] = 0;
    cout << "Default Constructor\n";
}
Poly::Poly(int Order)
{
    order = Order;
    size = order + 1;
    coeff = new int[size];
    for(int i(0); i <= order; i++)
        coeff[i] = 0;
    cout << "Order Constructor\n";
}
Poly::Poly(int Order, int * Coeff)
{
    order = Order;
    size = order + 1;
    coeff = new int[size];
    for(int i(0); i <= order; i++)
        coeff[i] = Coeff[i];
    cout << "Complete Constructor\n";
}
Poly::Poly(const Poly &rhs)
{
    order = rhs.order;
    size = rhs.size;
    int *coeff = new int[size];
    for(int i(0); i <= order; i++)
        coeff[i] = rhs.coeff[i];
    cout << "Copy Constructor\n";
}
void Poly::set(int * Coeff, int Order)
{
    order = Order;
    size = order + 1;
    for(int i(0); i <= order; i++)
        coeff[i] = Coeff[i];
}
Poly Poly::operator+(const Poly &rhs)
{
    int neworder = max(order, rhs.order);
    int * newcoeff = new int[neworder+1];
    Poly temp(neworder, newcoeff);
    delete [] newcoeff;

    for(int i(0); i <= temp.order; i++)
        temp.coeff[i] = 0;
    for(int i(0); i <= order; i++)
        temp.coeff[i] = coeff[i];
    for(int i(0); i <= rhs.order; i++)
        temp.coeff[i] += rhs.coeff[i];

    return Poly(temp.order, temp.coeff);
}

ostream &operator <<(ostream& out, const Poly &source)
{
    for(int i(source.order); i >= 0; i--)
    {
        if(i == 1)
        {
            if(i == source.order)
                if(source.coeff[i] == 1)
                    out << "X";
                else if(source.coeff[i] == -1)
                    out << "-X";
                else
                    out << source.coeff[i] << "X";
            else if(source.coeff[i] == 1)
                out << " + " << "X";
            else if(source.coeff[i] == -1)
                out << " - " << "X";
            else if(source.coeff[i] > 0)
                out << " + " << source.coeff[i] << "X";
            else if(source.coeff[i] < 0)
                out << " - " << abs(source.coeff[i]) << "X";
        }

        else if(i > 1)
        {   
            if(i == source.order)
                if(source.coeff[i] == 1)
                    out << "X^" << i;
                else if(source.coeff[i] == -1)
                    out << "-X^" << i;
                else
                    out << source.coeff[i] << "X^" << i;
            else if(source.coeff[i] == 1)
                out << " + " << "X^" << i;
            else if(source.coeff[i] == -1)
                out << " - " << "X^" << i;
            else if(source.coeff[i] > 1)
                out << " + " << source.coeff[i] << "X^" << i;
            else if(source.coeff[i] < -1)
                out << " - " << abs(source.coeff[i]) << "X^" << i;
        }
        else
        {
            if(source.coeff[i] > 0)
                out << " + " << source.coeff[i];
            else if(source.coeff[i] < 0)
                out << " - " << abs(source.coeff[i]);
        }
    }   
    out << endl;

   return out;
} 
Poly & Poly::operator=(const Poly &rhs)
{
    order = rhs.order;  
    for(int i(0); i <= rhs.order; i++)
        coeff[i] = rhs.coeff[i];

    return *this;
}
share|improve this question
1  
How much of this code can you remove and still make it generate the error? That will help you zero in on the problem. sscce.org –  Adam Liss Nov 11 '13 at 1:38
    
@Adam Liss I've shortened the code to 'isolate' the issue. I've also taken some comments from another user and applied them to the overloaded + operator. –  TriHard8 Nov 11 '13 at 2:26
    
Your operator= does bad things if this->order < rhs.order... –  aschepler Nov 11 '13 at 2:29
    
@aschepler you're absolutely right. That's where I had memory hanging. It seems to have resolved my problem. Thanks a bunch! –  TriHard8 Nov 11 '13 at 2:37

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Erm... this looks like a bad idea:

Poly Poly::operator*(const Poly &rhs)
{
    Poly temp;
    //...

    temp.set(newcoeff, neworder);

That looks broken, since Poly temp sets up a 0th order polynomial, but Poly::set doesn't reallocate coeff to the new size specified by neworder.

Poly::set ought to delete [] coeff and reallocate it to the new size specified by the new order.

I didn't look at the rest of the code to see if there are other, similar errors, but this one jumped out at me immediately.

For a more robust solution, you should consider replacing the int * with a vector<int>, and let the compiler and runtime manage memory for you. You don't even need to track size, because vector<>::size() will do that automagically for you.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 You beat me to it. I'd just spotted that. There's also a minor off-by-one error in the [] operators which test > size instead of >= size (or > order). –  paddy Nov 11 '13 at 1:45
    
@Joe Z, I wish I could use the vector, but we're not permitted for this assignment. I reworked the + operator, based on your comment, since i'm handling the memory the same as in the * operator. I'm still having an issue. –  TriHard8 Nov 11 '13 at 2:28
    
Did you rework set()? That's where the main issue was. It should update order, size and reallocate (ie. delete[] followed by new[]) coeff based on the new size before copying in the new coeffs. –  Joe Z Nov 11 '13 at 2:32
    
Your operator= has a similar problem to set(). It should be doing pretty much the same thing. –  Joe Z Nov 11 '13 at 2:51
    
@JoeZ Yes, I modified both of them. It took me a while to realize what was going on, but I finally got it. Thanks for your help. –  TriHard8 Nov 11 '13 at 3:02

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