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I have a text file (~ 300 MB large) with a nested list, similar to this one:

[[4, 9, 11, 28, 30, 45, 55, 58, 61, 62, 63, 69, 74, 76, 77, 82, 87, 92, 93, 94, 95], [4, 9, 11, 28, 30, 45, 55, 58, 61, 62, 63, 69, 74, 76, 77, 82, 87, 92, 93, 94],[4, 9, 11, 28, 30, 45, 55, 58, 61, 62, 63, 69, 74, 76, 77, 82, 85, 87, 92, 93, 94, 95]]

Here is my program to read the file into a haskell Integer list:

import qualified Data.ByteString as ByteStr

main :: IO ()

-- HOW to do the same thing but using ByteStr.readFile for file access?
main = do fContents <- readFile filePath 
          let numList = readNums fContents
          putStrLn (show nums)

This works for small text files, but I want to use ByteString to read the file quickly. I found out that there is no read function for ByteString, instead you should write your own parser in attoparsec, since it supports parsing ByteStrings.

How can I use attoparsec to parse the nested list?

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Do you want to read the whole list in one go, or process it in chunks? –  Lambda Fairy Nov 11 '13 at 4:37
    
read the list in one go. –  mrsteve Nov 11 '13 at 4:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The data seems to be in JSON format, so you can use Data.Aeson decode function which works on ByteString

import qualified Data.ByteString.Lazy as BL
import Data.Aeson
import Data.Maybe

main = do fContents <- BL.readFile filePath 
          let numList = decode fContents :: Maybe [[Int]]
          putStrLn (show $ fromJust numList)
share|improve this answer
    
it's now at least 50% faster for small files, perhaps even more for bigger ones. great! –  mrsteve Nov 11 '13 at 6:38
1  
For a 50MB file this quickly uses 10GB of memory. How can I imporve the memory useage? –  mrsteve Nov 11 '13 at 7:59
1  
Well [[Integer]] isn't the most memory efficient format (there probably isn't anything worse)... [[Int]] would be a bit better but a Vector of Vector of Int would probably be the right answer (and it should be faster too). Aeson should know how to decode that perfectly well. –  Jedai Nov 11 '13 at 16:55
    
I am using Int at the moment. Will try to use a Vector. I wonder if the problem is Aeson too, as I read somewhere that Aeson is very memory inefficient as it was meant to parse very fast small JSON messages. I have 100GB of RAM, so at the moment it works. –  mrsteve Nov 11 '13 at 18:25

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