Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an object of class 'D' in python, and I want to sequentially execute the 'run' method as defined by 'D' and each of it's ancestors ('A', 'B' and 'C').

I'm able to accomplish this like this

class A(object):
    def run_all(self):
        # I prefer to execute in revere MRO order
        for cls in reversed(self.__class__.__mro__):
            if hasattr(cls, 'run'):
                # This works
                cls.run(self)
                # This doesn't
                #cls.__getattribute__(self, 'run')()

    def run(self):
        print "Running A"

class B(A):
    def run(self):
        print "Running B"

class C(A):
    def run(self):
        print "Running C"

class D(C, B):
    def run(self):
        print "Running D"

if __name__ == "__main__":
    D().run_all()

Which results in

$ python test.py 
Running A
Running B
Running C
Running D

However in practice I won't know the name of the method to be executed. But if I try this using getattribute() (see the commented) line it doesn't work:

$ python test.py 
Running D
Running D
Running D
Running D

So my questions are:

  1. Why isn't it working?

  2. Is this even the best way to go about this?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

If you're OK with changing all the run implementations (and calling run instead of run_all in D), this works:

class A(object):
    def run(self):
        print "Running A"

class B(A):
    def run(self):
        super(B, self).run()
        print "Running B"

class C(A):
    def run(self):
        super(C, self).run()
        print "Running C"

class D(C, B):
    def run(self):
        super(D, self).run()
        print "Running D"

if __name__ == "__main__":
    D().run()

Note that I don't use super in the root class -- it "knows" there's no further superclass to go up to (object does not define a run method). Unfortunately, in Python 2, this is inevitably verbose (and not well suited to implementing via a decorator, either).

Your check on hasattr is quite fragile, if I understand your purposes correctly -- it will find that a class "has" the attribute if it defines or inherits it. So if you have an intermediate class that doesn't override run but does occur on the __mro__, the version of run it inherits gets called twice in your approach. E.g., consider:

class A(object):
    def run_all(self):
        for cls in reversed(self.__class__.__mro__):
            if hasattr(cls, 'run'):
                getattr(cls, 'run')(self)
    def run(self):
        print "Running A"
class B(A): pass
class C(A):
    def run(self):
        print "Running C"
class D(C, B): pass

if __name__ == "__main__":
    D().run_all()

this prints

Running A
Running A
Running C
Running C

with two "stutters" for versions of run that B and D inherit without overriding (from A and C respectively). Assuming I'm right that this is not the effect you want, if you're keen to avoid super you could try changing run_all to:

def run_all(self):
    for cls in reversed(self.__class__.__mro__):
        meth = cls.__dict__.get('run')
        if meth is not None: meth(self)

which, substituted into my latest example with just two distinct defs for run in A and C, makes the example print:

Running A
Running C

which I suspect may be closer to what you want.

One more side point: don't repeat the work -- hasattr guarding getattr, or an in test guarding dict access -- both the check in the guard, and the guarded accessor, must repeat exactly the same work internally, to no good purpose. Rather, use a third argument of None to a single getattr call (or the get method of the dict): this means that if the method is absent you'll retrieve a None value, and then you can guard the call against that occurrence. This is exactly the reason dicts have a get method and getattr has a third optional "default" argument: to make it easy to apply DRY, "don't repeat yourself", a very important maxim of good programming!-)

share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly what I was looking for, and you are quite right about the "stutters", I hadn't thought of that. Thanks everyone! –  russell_h Jan 2 '10 at 1:28
    
Also, as I understand it, to use super with multiple inheritance you do need to call it from the 'root' class in order to traverse the whole tree/diamond/whatever (as Roberto did below), although I could be wrong on that. –  russell_h Jan 2 '10 at 1:31
    
Ah, I see what you mean. I stand corrected. –  russell_h Jan 2 '10 at 2:47

You should not use __getattribute__ method..

just do the following:

getattr(cls, 'run')(self)
share|improve this answer
1  
you can use getattribute, but it will look very "not nice" - cls.__getattribute__(cls, 'run')(self) –  Pydev UA Jan 1 '10 at 22:30

Why don't you simply use super? Although some consider it harmful, it was designed with exactly this kind of scenario in mind, and I would use it without any hesitation.

From Python documentation:

This is useful for accessing inherited methods that have been overridden in a class. The search order is same as that used by getattr() except that the type itself is skipped. [...] This makes it possible to implement “diamond diagrams” where multiple base classes implement the same method.

Update: In your case, it would become something like this:

class A(object):

    def run(self):
        print "Running A"

class B(A):
    def run(self):
        super(B, self).run()
        print "Running B"

class C(A):
    def run(self):
        super(C, self).run()
        print "Running C"

class D(C, B):
    def run(self):
        super(D, self).run()
        print "Running D"

if __name__ == "__main__":
    D().run()
share|improve this answer
    
I tried that originally, but I had trouble with super(self.__class__, self) (it always seems to return self.__class__, at least in the situation above) and I don't want the user to have to call it every time. –  russell_h Jan 1 '10 at 22:56
    
Yep, super requires explicit specification of the class, as in my answer's first code suggestion -- using self.__class__ in it just can't work right. (Python 3 is a bit better that way, btw). –  Alex Martelli Jan 1 '10 at 23:04
    
Why don't you use directly super(D, self).run() ? I am putting an example in the main answer. –  Roberto Liffredo Jan 1 '10 at 23:04
    
In my case subclasses will represent server configurations which can be inherited, etc, and I'm trying to keep the syntax as declarative as possible within the limits of python. So I don't want every method of every subclass to have to manually call super. –  russell_h Jan 2 '10 at 1:09
    
@Roberto, you're simply wrong in stating that "you need to call super even on the "root" class of your hierarchy"! Just try your code, and you'll see a traceback with AttributeError: 'super' object has no attribute 'run'; remove that super call in A.run which you claim is needed, just like my answer's code omitted it, and you'll see the traceback disappear, and everything just work... exactly as it works in my answer, of course, since, once this terrible error is fixed, your code's then identical to mine;-). –  Alex Martelli Jan 2 '10 at 2:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.