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Please help, I couldn't figure this out.

function Tour(el) {
  var tour = this;
  this.el = el;
  this.fetchPhotos = function() { 
    $.ajax('/photos.html', {
      data: {location: tour.el.data('location')},
      context: tour,
      success: function(response) {
        this.el.find('.photos').html(response).fadeIn();
      },
      error: function() {
        this.el.find('.photos').html('<li>There was a problem fetching the latest photos. Please try again.</li>');
      },
      timeout: 3000,
      beforeSend: function() {
        this.el.addClass('is-fetching');
      },
      complete: function() {
        this.el.removeClass('is-fetching');
      }
    });
  }
  this.el.on('click', 'button', this.fetchPhotos);
}
$(document).ready(function() { 
  var paris = new Tour($('#paris'));
});

in the function above, I know the context: tour sets this inside the this.fetchPhotos function to reference Tour. So my question is why can this part of code tour.el.data('location') change to this.el.data('location')?

Thank you in advanced for your help

share|improve this question
    
Read this . –  Tushar Gupta Nov 11 '13 at 6:38
    
you are losing context of this within $.ajax, declare as a different variable outside $.ajax –  charlietfl Nov 11 '13 at 6:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The reason that works is because tour.el.data('location') is called from fetchPhotos.

As long as you do

new Tour().fetchPhotos();

and not

var f = new Tour().fetchPhotos;
f();

the replacement will work.

But doing

this.el.on('click', 'button', this.fetchPhotos);

is like the latter. It does not work the same.

share|improve this answer
    
To expand a little: a rule of thumb is, that the context is whatever is on the left side of the dot when the function is called. this.fetchPhotos doesn't call the method, instead one could imagine it to happen like this: var callback = arguments[2]; callback.call(that, args); where that === el. –  Derija93 Nov 11 '13 at 7:32
    
@Derija93, good explanation for an often poorly explained concept. –  Paul Draper Nov 11 '13 at 7:34

As charlietfl wrote, this is a different context inside ajax callbacks, you have to cache this to any variable before ajax call and use that variable. Like you did in tour variable:

function Tour(el) {
  var tour = this;
  this.el = el;
  this.fetchPhotos = function() { 
    $.ajax('/photos.html', {
      data: {location: tour.el.data('location')},
      context: tour,
      success: function(response) {
        tour.el.find('.photos').html(response).fadeIn();
      },
      error: function() {
        tour.el.find('.photos').html('<li>There was a problem fetching the latest photos. Please try again.</li>');
      },
      timeout: 3000,
      beforeSend: function() {
        tour.el.addClass('is-fetching');
      },
      complete: function() {
        tour.el.removeClass('is-fetching');
      }
    });
  }
  this.el.on('click', 'button', this.fetchPhotos);
}
$(document).ready(function() { 
  var paris = new Tour($('#paris'));
});

Outside of the ajax call (like the click event binder) it is ok to use this, but in those callback functions, it refers to that callback handler

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