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var d=[
  {
    'fn':'john',
    'en':'doe',
    'k':['0','5','44']
  },

  {
    'en':'bark',
    'k':[,'25','44']
  }
];


merge(d[0],d[1]); should return this:

  {
    'fn':'john',
    'en':'bark',
    'k':['0','5','25','44']
  }

It's a common merge, only difference is that the arrays gets pushed if they are different (just like the fn variable, it just gets added, or like the en variable, it gets replaced, or like the k array, it gets pushed if it's different)(and sorted at the same time)

Edit 1
Writing the script for me is not what I'm asking for, I'm not familiar with "is array" and "hasPropery" since I am not familiar with that, I'm asking for a help in a direction, and I am using nodejs so jquery is a no-no.

Edit 2
here's the code that I used to solve the problem in case anyone is curious:

function is(obj, type) {
    return Object.prototype.toString.call(obj).slice(8, -1) == type;
}

Array.prototype.unique = function() {
var a=this;
    for(var i=0; i<a.length; ++i) {
        for(var j=i+1; j<a.length; ++j) {
            if(a[i] === a[j])
                a.splice(j--, 1);
        }
    }
    return a;
};

Object.prototype.merge = function(b) {
  var a=this;
  for(var prop in b){
    if(is(b[prop],'Array')&&is(a[prop],'Array')){
      a[prop]=a[prop].concat(b[prop]).unique().sort(function(a,b){return parseInt(a)-parseInt(b)});
    }else{
      a[prop]=b[prop];
    }
  }
  return a;
}

d[0].merge(d[1]) gives me exactly what I asked for.

share|improve this question
1  
are you asking for someone to write the function for you? Because I am sure you could pay someone to do that, at least try to do it first and then we can help you if you get stuck. –  gabriel Nov 11 '13 at 8:53
    
Did you work out the sort part? In your example the items are sorted as though they are numbers but they are actually strings. A default sort of the array would give you: ["0", "25", "44", "5"] –  HMR Nov 11 '13 at 11:47
    
I did use parseInt on purpose for my own solution. –  Harry Svensson Nov 11 '13 at 14:42
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To optimize the array merge you could sort it first and then check unique. The following would work if your objects only contain primitive values or arrays and an array only contain primitives of the same time:

var tools = {
  merge:function(a,b){
    var ret = {},key,i=-1,len=arguments.length;
    //as in your example, if both items have a property
    // named "en" then the property of the second one is used
    while(i++<len){
      this._merge(ret,arguments[i]);
    }
    for(key in ret){
      if(this._couldBeArray(ret[key])){
         //sort and plice are mutator functions that means 
         //they will change the object when called.
         this._unique(ret[key].sort(this._sortNum));
      }
    };
    return ret;
  },
  _couldBeArray:function(obj){
    return(typeof obj==="object" &&
      /Array\]$/.test(Object.prototype.toString.call(obj)));
  },
  _merge:function(a,b){
    var key;
    for(key in b){
      if(b.hasOwnProperty(key)){
        if(this._couldBeArray(b[key])){
            //assuming it's an array, concat only does a 
            //  shallow copy as well though
            a[key]=(a[key])?b[key].concat(a[key]):
              (new b[key].constructor()).concat(b[key]);
        }else{
         a[key]=b[key];
        }
      }
    }
  },
  _unique:function(arr){
    var i=arr.length;
    while(i!==0){
      //unique assumes your array contains only primitives
      //  of same type for example: 0 does not equal "0"
      if(arr[i]===arr[i-1]){
        arr.splice(i,1);
      }
      i--;
    }
    if(arr[i]===arr[i+1])
      arr.splice(i,1);
  },
  _sortNum:function(a,b){
    return parseInt(a,10)-parseInt(b,10);
  }
};

var d=[
  {
    'fn':'john',
    'en':'doe',
    'k':['0','5','44']
  },
  {
    'en':'bark',
    'k':['25','44']
  },
  {
    'another':'another',
    'k':['100','44','45'],
    'primitiveArray':[1,2,3]
  },
  {
    'city':'NY',
    'primitiveArray':[2,3,4,5]
  }
];
console.log(tools.merge.apply(tools,d));
share|improve this answer
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use jQuery's .extend:

//$.extend(deepCopy,target,object1,object2);
var data = $.extend(true,{},d[0],d[1]);
console.log(data.en);

You can separately merge your inner arrays like this:

data.k=d[0].k.concat(d[1].k).unique();
console.log(data.k.join(","));

where unique() is a custom function added to Array prototype:

Array.prototype.unique = function() {
    var a = this.concat();
    for(var i=0; i<a.length; ++i) {
        for(var j=i+1; j<a.length; ++j) {
            if(a[i] === a[j])
                a.splice(j--, 1);
        }
    }

    return a;
};
share|improve this answer
    
This got me into the right direction, thank you! –  Harry Svensson Nov 11 '13 at 9:51
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