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I have a DIV with some characters. How can I remove the last character from the text with each click on the DIV itself?

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1  
where in the <div> text are you deleting the character from? From the end? from the start? –  Russ Cam Jan 2 '10 at 1:25

9 Answers 9

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Removing First Character

​$("div").on("click", function(){
    $(this).text(function(index, text){
        return text.replace(/^.(\s+)?/, '');
    });
});​​​​​​​​​​​​

Removing Last Character

$("div").on("click", function(){
    $(this).text(function(index, text){
        return text.replace(/(\s+)?.$/, '');
    });
});

Removing a Specific Char

$("div").on("click", function(){
    $(this).text(function(index, text){
        return text.replace(/r/gi, '');
    });
});

See an example of each online at: http://jsfiddle.net/Xcn6s/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the quick reply, but what should i replace "r" with so it delete all kinds of characters? –  Mikkel Jan 2 '10 at 1:30
    
Which characters do you want to delete, Mikkel? –  Jonathan Sampson Jan 2 '10 at 1:31
3  
Don't write html from text, you will mis-handle < and & characters leading to potential XSS. Plus, fails when the last character in the text is \n, as . will not match a newline. –  bobince Jan 5 '10 at 23:37
5  
since when does jQuery now qualify for de-facto JavaScript? –  asnyder Jun 25 '10 at 15:02
3  
asnyder: There is a jQuery tag on the question, presumably put there by the questioner. –  Tim Down Jun 25 '10 at 15:18

Alternative to Jonathan's answer, how to delete the first character:

$("div.myDiv").click(function(){
    $(this).html($(this).text().substring(1));
});

Or, remove the last character:

$("div.myDiv").click(function(){
    $(this).html($(this).text().replace(/.$/g, ''));
});

Or, go crazy and remove a character from a random place:

$("div.myDiv").click(function(){
    var text = $(this).text();
    var index = Math.round(Math.random() * (text.length - 1));
    var result = text.substring(0, index) + text.substring(index + 1, text.length - 1);
    $(this).html(result);
});

Instead of random place, you can use the above function with a predefined index to remove from a specific location.

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Thank you very much, it works perfectly. –  Mikkel Jan 2 '10 at 1:39
    
Mikkel, could you please tell us what is it you wanted? Tatu provided numerous examples - none of us knows what it was you actually wanted :) –  Jonathan Sampson Jan 2 '10 at 1:41
    
Yea, that would have been nice to know, and if Mikkel had just explained that in his original question, none of us would have had to do so much guessing :) –  Tatu Ulmanen Jan 2 '10 at 1:44
    
I just wanted to remove the last character no matter what character it was. Your code required a specific character. But i appreciate you tried to help. Thanks :D –  Mikkel Jan 2 '10 at 1:46
    
Oh you updated it, sorry i didn't notice it. It's my first time using this site. –  Mikkel Jan 2 '10 at 1:52

This deletes a character each time you click on the div. Without more requirements, I can't give you any more.

<html>

<head>
    <script>

    function deleteChar(div) {
       div.innerHTML = div.innerHTML.replace(/.$/, '');
    }

    </script>
</head>

<body>

    <div onclick="deleteChar(this)">this is my div</div>

</body>
</html>

Oh, sorry, you asked for jquery... Well, this is how you do it in straight javascript.

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If you wanted to delete the first character of the text every click you could use substring. e.g.:

$("#textDiv").click(function(){
  $(this).html($(this).text().substring(1));
});
share|improve this answer
    
Reads from text, writes to html: if there are any < or & characters in there you've just changed their meaning and may have injected bad JavaScript into the page. –  bobince Jan 5 '10 at 23:34

To supplemnt on Jonathons answer, use..

$("div.myDiv").click(function(){
  $(this).html( $(this).text().replace("/.$/gi", "o") );
});

To remove the last character

share|improve this answer

Its easy by using the attribute$= CSS3 selector which means "ends with" in your jQuery selection:

To Delete 1st character:

$("div[id$=/]").each(function(){ 
    this.id = this.id.substr(1);
});

To Delete Last Character:

$("div[id$=/]").each(function(){ 
    this.id = this.id.substr(0,this.id.length - 1);
});
share|improve this answer
    
What do divs with ids ending in / have to do with this? –  Tatu Ulmanen Jan 2 '10 at 1:37
    
Using Adobe® Browser Lab, I tested this code in IE6, IE7, Firefox 2.0 and Firefox 3.0, Safari 3.0. I have also tested locally in Safari 4.0 and Firefox 3.5. In all browsers it worked properly, and removed the trailing / from the id. –  Ashish Jan 2 '10 at 1:42
    
I don't think you understand the question - the OP wants the last character from within the div removed. –  Nick Presta Jan 2 '10 at 7:33
    
you're not changing the content of the node, you're changing the id of it... –  Dan Beam Jan 4 '10 at 20:07

Plain JavaScript:

<div id="text">This is some text</div>
<script>
var node = text.firstChild;
var nodeValue = "";
var nodeValueLength = 0;
text.onclick = function () {
    nodeValue = node.nodeValue;
    node.nodeValue = nodeValue.substring(0, nodeValue.length - 1);
};
</script>
share|improve this answer
    
This won't work. Text nodes don't raise click events. Where is the text variable defined? Why build up the new node value a character at a time? –  Tim Down Jan 2 '10 at 12:23
    
text is defined by the id and substring is probably a better method. –  GR1000 Jan 2 '10 at 15:50
    
My first point was invalid because I misread one line, so sorry about that. You would be better off defining text with document.getElementById("text"), since not all browsers (possibly only IE does) create references to elements from their IDs. Also, nodeValue.slice(0, -1) is more concise than the substring version. –  Tim Down Jan 4 '10 at 13:28

Edit: here's the easiest way to do this without any library dependencies

function removeLastChar(node) {
    var i = node.childNodes.length;
    while (--i >= 0) {
        if (3 === node.childNodes[i].nodeType) {
            node.childNodes[i].data = node.childNodes[i].data.replace(/\S\s*$/, '');
            break;
        }
    }
}

/\S\s*$/ still means "the last non-space at the end"

Note: borrowed from Tim Down's solution and further years of web development experience, :)

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Would the downvoter please explain why they downvoted this answer? –  Tim Down Jan 2 '10 at 15:43
    
@Tim Down - I don't know why it was voted down, either. there's alot of trolls on StackOverflow, but there's also people that know more than me (so you never quite know). don't worry, my feelings aren't hurt, haha. Ash Searle agrees with my use of negative numbers in String.prototype.substr hexmen.com/blog/2009/12/javascript-date-to-time/… (link only works in FF) –  Dan Beam Jan 4 '10 at 20:12
    
@Dan Beam - yes, I used the same slice trick in my answer. I have previously read that article you linked to (and left a comment). –  Tim Down Jan 4 '10 at 20:56
    
hahaha, that's funny. Ash is a smart guy. do you have any clue who he works for? it's a very bold statement to suggest changes to the most popular web page on the planet (google.com), haha! –  Dan Beam Jan 4 '10 at 23:39
1  
Not my downvote, but working on the HTML will cause problems when there is a < or & character as it will delete the trailing ; of the &entref; instead of the whole character. A browser might then fix it up by putting the ; back. –  bobince Jan 6 '10 at 0:29

Assuming you have a reference to the div and it just contains a single text node (as your question implies), this is very simple. Here's a non-jQuery solution:

div.onclick = function() {
    var textNode = this.firstChild;
    textNode.data = textNode.data.slice(0, -1);
};
share|improve this answer
    
Would the downvoter please explain why they downvoted this answer? –  Tim Down Jan 2 '10 at 15:41
1  
I didn't vote it down, but are you sure this.firstChild.data is what you want to do (OP didn't say there were any children in the div, and does .data work in all browsers)? why not use this.innerHTML? –  Dan Beam Jan 4 '10 at 20:09
1  
I took "I have a DIV with some characters" to mean something like <div>blah blah</div>, in which case the first (and only) child is a text node. The data property of text nodes is supported in all major browsers (including IE back to version 5). It's much quicker than using innerHTML because all it has to do is change one text property and re-render it in the document, while innerHTML has to build the innerHTML, parse it into a DOM node tree and then reinsert it into the document. data is also specified in the DOM standard and behaves uniformly across browsers, unlike innerHTML. –  Tim Down Jan 4 '10 at 20:53
    
cool, man. good to know! –  Dan Beam Jan 4 '10 at 23:40
    
data is DOM Level 1 Core and absolutely solid everywhere; it's fine as long as you're sure there's exactly one text node child. At least this answer manages not to allow HTML injection, and doesn't get stuck on newlines, unlike most of the others here! –  bobince Jan 5 '10 at 23:45

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