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A default MVC 5 App comes with this piece of code in IdentityModels.cs - this piece of code is for all the ASP.NET Identity operations for the default templates:

public class ApplicationDbContext : IdentityDbContext<ApplicationUser>
{
    public ApplicationDbContext()
        : base("DefaultConnection")
    {
    }
}

If I scaffold a new controller using views with Entity Framework and create a "New data context..." in the dialog, I get this generated for me:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Data.Entity;
using System.Linq;
using System.Web;

namespace WebApplication1.Models
{
    public class AllTheOtherStuffDbContext : DbContext
    {
        // You can add custom code to this file. Changes will not be overwritten.
        // 
        // If you want Entity Framework to drop and regenerate your database
        // automatically whenever you change your model schema, please use data migrations.
        // For more information refer to the documentation:
        // http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/data/jj591621.aspx

        public AllTheOtherStuffDbContext() : base("name=AllTheOtherStuffDbContext")
        {
        }

        public System.Data.Entity.DbSet<WebApplication1.Models.Movie> Movies { get; set; }

    }
} 

If I scaffold another controller + view using EF, say for instance for an Animal model, this new line would get autogenerated right under public System.Data.Entity.DbSet<WebApplication1.Models.Movie> Movies { get; set; } - like this:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Data.Entity;
using System.Linq;
using System.Web;

namespace WebApplication1.Models
{
    public class AllTheOtherStuffDbContext : DbContext
    {
        // You can add custom code to this file. Changes will not be overwritten.
        // 
        // If you want Entity Framework to drop and regenerate your database
        // automatically whenever you change your model schema, please use data migrations.
        // For more information refer to the documentation:
        // http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/data/jj591621.aspx

        public AllTheOtherStuffDbContext() : base("name=AllTheOtherStuffDbContext")
        {
        }

        public System.Data.Entity.DbSet<WebApplication1.Models.Movie> Movies { get; set; }
        public System.Data.Entity.DbSet<WebApplication1.Models.Animal> Animals { get; set; }

    }
} 

ApplicationDbContext (for all the ASP.NET Identity stuff) inherits from IdentityDbContext which in turn inherits from DbContext. AllOtherStuffDbContext (for my own stuff) inherits from DbContext.

So my question is:

Which of these two (ApplicationDbContext and AllOtherStuffDbContext) should I use for all my other own models? Or should I just use the default autogenerated ApplicationDbContext since it shouldn't be a problem using it since it derives from the base class DbContext, or will there be some overhead? You should use only one DbContext object in your app for all your models (I've read this somewhere) so I should not even consider using both ApplicationDbContext and AllOtherStuffDbContext in a single app? Or what is best practice in MVC 5 with ASP.NET Identity?

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By the way; this is superugly and is unnecessary for my eyes while scanning the document: public System.Data.Entity.DbSet<WebApplication1.Models.Movie> Movies { get; set; } - the System.Data.Entity and WebApplication1.Models part. Can't it be removed from the declaration and instead add the namespaces in the using statements section? –  PussInBoots Nov 11 '13 at 9:33
    
Puss - yes to your comment. That should work just fine. –  SB2055 Jan 9 '14 at 19:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 62 down vote accepted

I would use a single Context class inheriting from IdentityDbContext. This way you can have the context be aware of any relations between your classes and the IdentityUser and Roles of the IdentityDbContext. There is very little overhead in the IdentityDbContext, it is basically a regular DbContext with two DbSets. One for the users and one for the roles.

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1  
+1 this works perfectly for me –  rwisch45 Nov 11 '13 at 17:35
25  
That is for a single MVC5 project but not desirable when the derived DbContext is shared amongst multiple projects, some not MVC5, where some do not need the Identity support. –  Dave Feb 19 '14 at 17:10
    
Voted for same database for easier maintainability and better relational integrity. Because the user entity and role entity will be related into other application objects easily. –  anIBMer Mar 11 '14 at 13:48
3  
@Dave - It complicates partitioning of user data by using two different contexts. Does your MVC app partition data by user but the other apps don't. Sharing the same data layer is common, but I don't think it's common that some projects need the data portioned by user, and some don't. –  RickAnd - MSFT Feb 22 at 6:41
1  
After looking for about an hour this answer pointed me in the right direction - but I wasn't sure how to implement it (for a very literal person me). So if it helps someone else, I found the simplest way is open the IdentityModels.cs, and add your new DbSet in the ApplicationDbContext class. –  s1t0b Apr 25 at 14:14

If you drill down through the abstractions of the IdentityDbContext you'll find that it looks just like your derived DbContext. The easiest route is Olav's answer, but if you want more control over what's getting created and a little less dependency on the Identity packages have a look at my question and answer here. There's a code example if you follow the link, but in summary you just add the required DbSets to your own DbContext subclass.

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This is a late entry for folks, but below is my implementation. You will also notice I stubbed-out the ability to change the the KEYs default type: the details about which can be found in the following articles:

NOTES:
It should be noted that you cannot use Guid's for your keys. This is because under the hood they are a Struct, and as such, have no unboxing which would allow their conversion from a generic <TKey> parameter.

THE CLASSES LOOK LIKE:

public class ApplicationDbContext : IdentityDbContext<ApplicationUser, CustomRole, string, CustomUserLogin, CustomUserRole, CustomUserClaim>
{
    #region <Constructors>

    public ApplicationDbContext() : base(Settings.ConnectionString.Database.AdministrativeAccess)
    {
    }

    #endregion

    #region <Properties>

    //public DbSet<Case> Case { get; set; }

    #endregion

    #region <Methods>

    #region

    protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);

        //modelBuilder.Configurations.Add(new ResourceConfiguration());
        //modelBuilder.Configurations.Add(new OperationsToRolesConfiguration());
    }

    #endregion

    #region

    public static ApplicationDbContext Create()
    {
        return new ApplicationDbContext();
    }

    #endregion

    #endregion
}

    public class ApplicationUser : IdentityUser<string, CustomUserLogin, CustomUserRole, CustomUserClaim>
    {
        #region <Constructors>

        public ApplicationUser()
        {
            Init();
        }

        #endregion

        #region <Properties>

        [Required]
        [StringLength(250)]
        public string FirstName { get; set; }

        [Required]
        [StringLength(250)]
        public string LastName { get; set; }

        #endregion

        #region <Methods>

        #region private

        private void Init()
        {
            Id = Guid.Empty.ToString();
        }

        #endregion

        #region public

        public async Task<ClaimsIdentity> GenerateUserIdentityAsync(UserManager<ApplicationUser, string> manager)
        {
            // Note the authenticationType must match the one defined in CookieAuthenticationOptions.AuthenticationType
            var userIdentity = await manager.CreateIdentityAsync(this, DefaultAuthenticationTypes.ApplicationCookie);

            // Add custom user claims here

            return userIdentity;
        }

        #endregion

        #endregion
    }

    public class CustomUserStore : UserStore<ApplicationUser, CustomRole, string, CustomUserLogin, CustomUserRole, CustomUserClaim>
    {
        #region <Constructors>

        public CustomUserStore(ApplicationDbContext context) : base(context)
        {
        }

        #endregion
    }

    public class CustomUserRole : IdentityUserRole<string>
    {
    }

    public class CustomUserLogin : IdentityUserLogin<string>
    {
    }

    public class CustomUserClaim : IdentityUserClaim<string> 
    { 
    }

    public class CustomRoleStore : RoleStore<CustomRole, string, CustomUserRole>
    {
        #region <Constructors>

        public CustomRoleStore(ApplicationDbContext context) : base(context)
        {
        } 

        #endregion
    }

    public class CustomRole : IdentityRole<string, CustomUserRole>
    {
        #region <Constructors>

        public CustomRole() { }
        public CustomRole(string name) 
        { 
            Name = name; 
        }

        #endregion
    }
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