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Does anyone know what is the worst possible asymptotic slowdown that can happen when programming purely functionally as opposed to imperatively (i.e. allowing side-effects)?

Clarification from comment by itowlson: is there any problem for which the best known non-destructive algorithm is asymptotically worse than the best known destructive algorithm, and if so by how much?

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The same as when programming imperatively, whatever that is. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 2 '10 at 3:08
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@jldupont: To return the result of a computation of course. Many side effect free programs exist. They just can't do much other than compute on their input. But that's still useful. –  jalf Jan 2 '10 at 3:14
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I can make it as bad as you like, by writing my functional code badly! *grin* I think what you're asking is "is there any problem which for which the best known non-destructive algorithm is asymptotically worse than the best known destructive algorithm, and if so by how much?"... is that right? –  itowlson Jan 2 '10 at 3:14
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What? Why was this question closed? It's a real question, with a real answer that I have provided (at least a partial answer, via reference to the appropriate literature). Why is this question proving so hard for anyone else to understand? The obvious interpretation of this question is that which itowlson provided, which I have answered below. I find it odd that so many people jumped to other interpretations of the question and voted to close it. –  Brian Campbell Jan 2 '10 at 4:19
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A user deleted his answer, but he claimed that the functional version of 8-queens problem ran in over a minute for n = 13. He admitted it wasn't "written very well", so I decided to write my own version of the 8 queens in F#: pastebin.com/ffa8d4c4 . Needless to say, my purely function program computes n = 20 in just over a second. –  Juliet Jan 2 '10 at 5:21

6 Answers 6

up vote 439 down vote accepted

According to Pippenger [1996], when comparing a Lisp system that is purely functional (and has strict evaluation semantics, not lazy) to one that can mutate data, an algorithm written for the impure Lisp that runs in O(n) can be translated to an algorithm in the pure Lisp that runs in O(n log n) time (based on work by Ben-Amram and Galil [1992] about simulating random access memory using only pointers). Pippenger also establishes that there are algorithms for which that is the best you can do; there are problems which are O(n) in the impure system which are Ω(n log n) in the pure system.

There are a few caveats to be made about this paper. The most significant is that it does not address lazy functional languages, such as Haskell. Bird, Jones and De Moor [1997] demonstrate that the problem constructed by Pippenger can be solved in a lazy functional language in O(n) time, but they do not establish (and as far as I know, no one has) whether or not a lazy functional language can solve all problems in the same asymptotic running time as a language with mutation.

The problem constructed by Pippenger requires Ω(n log n) is specifically constructed to achieve this result, and is not necessarily representative of practical, real-world problems. There are a few restrictions on the problem that are a bit unexpected, but necessary for the proof to work; in particular, the problem requires that results are computed on-line, without being able to access future input, and that the input consists of a sequence of atoms from an unbounded set of possible atoms, rather than a fixed size set. And the paper only establishes (lower bound) results for an impure algorithm of linear running time; for problems that require a greater running time, it is possible that the extra O(log n) factor seen in the linear problem may be able to be "absorbed" in the process of extra operations necessary for algorithms with greater running times. These clarifications and open questions are explored briefly by Ben-Amram [1996].

In practice, many algorithms can be implemented in a pure functional language at the same efficiency as in a language with mutable data structures. For a good reference on techniques to use for implementing purely functional data structures efficiently, see Chris Okasaki's "Purely Functional Data Structures" [Okasaki 1998] (which is an expanded version of his thesis [Okasaki 1996]).

Anyone who needs to implement algorithms on purely-functional data structures should read Okasaki. You can always get at worst an O(log n) slowdown per operation by simulating mutable memory with a balanced binary tree, but in many cases you can do considerably better than that, and Okasaki describes many useful techniques, from amortized techniques to real-time ones that do the amortized work incrementally. Purely functional data structures can be a bit difficult to work with and analyze, but they provide many benefits like referential transparency that are helpful in compiler optimization, in parallel and distributed computing, and in implementation of features like versioning, undo, and rollback.

Note also that all of this discusses only asymptotic running times. Many techniques for implementing purely functional data structures give you a certain amount of constant factor slowdown, due to extra bookkeeping necessary for them to work, and implementation details of the language in question. The benefits of purely functional data structures may outweigh these constant factor slowdowns, so you will generally need to make trade-offs based on the problem in question.

References

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Pippinger is the undisputed authority on this question. But we should emphasize that his results are theoretical, not practical. When it comes to making functional data structures practical and efficient, you can't do better than Okasaki. –  Norman Ramsey Jan 2 '10 at 4:37
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itowlson: I must admit that I did not read enough of Pippenger to answer your question; it was published in a peer reviewed journal, cited by Okasaki, and I read enough of it to determine that his claims are relevant to this question, but not enough to understand the proof. The immediate takeaway that I get for real-world consequences is that it is trivial to convert an O(n) impure algorithm into an O(n log n) pure one, by simply simulating modifiable memory using a balanced binary tree. There are problems that cannot do better than that; I don't know if they're purely theoretical. –  Brian Campbell Jan 2 '10 at 4:58
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The Pippenger result makes two important assumptions that limit its scope: it considers "on-line" or "reactive" computations (not the usual model of a computation mapping finite inputs to a single output) and "symbolic" computations where inputs are sequences of atoms, which can be tested only for equality (i.e., the interpretation of the input is extremely primitive). –  Chris Conway Jan 2 '10 at 16:46
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Very good answer; I would like to add that for purely functional languages there is no universally agreed upon model for computing complexity, while in the impure world the unit-cost RAM machine is relatively standard (so this makes comparing things more difficult). Also note that the upper bound of a Lg(N) difference in pure/impure can be intuitively explained very easily by looking at an implementation of arrays in a pure language (it costs lg(n) per operation (and you get history)). –  user51568 May 23 '10 at 12:36
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Important point: Painstakingly translating a purely functional specification into a more complicated efficient purely functional implementation is of little benefit if you are going to eventually - either automatically or by hand - translate it into even more efficient impure code. Impurity is not such a big deal if you can keep it in a cage, e.g. by locking it up in an externally-side-effect-free function. –  Robin Green Apr 12 '12 at 20:24

There are indeed several algorithms and data structures for which no asymptotically efficient purely functional solution (t.i. one implementable in pure lambda calculus) is known, even with laziness.

  • The aforementioned union-find
  • Hash tables
  • Arrays
  • Some graph algorithms
  • ...

However, we assume that in "imperative" languages access to memory is O(1) whereas in theory that can't be so asymptotically (i.e. for unbounded problem sizes) and access to memory within a huge dataset is always O(log n), which can be emulated in a functional language.

Also, we must remember that actually all modern functional languages provide mutable data, and Haskell even provides it without sacrificing purity (the ST monad).

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If the dataset fits in physical memory, access to it is O(1) in that it is possible to find an absolute upper bound on the amount of time to read any item. If the dataset does not, you're talking about I/O and that will be the dominant factor by far, however the program is written. –  Donal Fellows May 23 '10 at 14:54
    
Well, of course I'm talking about O(log n) operations of access to external memory. However, in any case I was talking bs: external memory can also be O(1)-addressable... –  jkff May 23 '10 at 18:14
    
I think one of the biggest things which imperative programming gains compared with functional programming is the ability to hold references to many distinct aspects of one state, and generate a new state such that all those references point to the corresponding aspects of the new state. Using functional programming would require direct dereferencing operations to be replaced by lookup operations to find the appropriate aspect of a particular version of the current overall state. –  supercat Jun 16 '13 at 4:28

This article claims that the known purely functional implementations of the union-find algorithm all have worse asymptotic complexity than the one they publish, which has a purely functional interface but uses mutable data internally.

The fact that other answers claim that there can never be any difference and that for instance, the only "drawback" of purely functional code is that it can be parallelized gives you an idea of the informedness/objectivity of the functional programming community on these matters.

EDIT:

Comments below point out that a biased discussion of the pros and cons of pure functional programming may not come from the “functional programming community”. Good point. Perhaps the advocates I see are just, to cite a comment, “illiterate”.

For instance, I think that this blog post is written by someone who could be said to be representative of the functional programming community, and since it's a list of “points for lazy evaluation”, it would be a good place to mention any drawback that lazy and purely functional programming might have. A good place would have been in place of the following (technically true, but biased to the point of not being funny) dismissal:

If strict a function has O(f(n)) complexity in a strict language then it has complexity O(f(n)) in a lazy language as well. Why worry? :)

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With a fixed upper bound on memory usage, there should be no difference.

Proof sketch: Given a fixed upper bound on memory usage, one should be able to write a virtual machine which executes an imperative instruction set with the same asymptotic complexity as if you were actually executing on that machine. This is so because you can manage the mutable memory as a persistent data structure, giving O(log(n)) read and writes, but with a fixed upper bound on memory usage, you can have a fixed amount of memory, causing these to decay to O(1). Thus the functional implementation can be the imperative version running in the functional implementation of the VM, and so they should both have the same asymptotic complexity.

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A fixed upper bound on memory usage isn't how people analyze these sorts of things; you assume an arbitrarily large, but finite memory. When implementing an algorithm, I'm interested in how it will scale from the simplest input up to any arbitrary input size. If you put a fixed upper bound on memory usage, why don't you also put a fixed upper bound on how long you'll allow the computation to take, and say that everything is O(1)? –  Brian Campbell Jan 2 '10 at 18:27
    
@Brian Campbell: That is true. I'm just suggesting that if you wanted to, you could ignore the difference in the constant factor in many cases in practice. One would still need to be mindful of the difference when compromising between memory and time to make sure that using m times more memory decreases your runtime by at least a factor of log(m). –  Brian Jan 2 '10 at 21:47

I'd suggest reading on performance of Haskell, and then taking a look at Alioth Language Shootout performances for functional languages vs. procedural/OO ones.

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"Functional" is a bunch of different features, each of which is independently useful, and its found more useful to look at each individually.

Immutability

Now that I'm familiar with it, any time I can get away with returning an immutable result, I always try to do that, even in an object oriented program. It's easier to reason about the program if you have value-type data.

Functions as First Class Types

Whatever you want to call it, passing around delegates, actions, or functions, is a really handy way to solve a whole class of real world problems, like the "hole in the middle pattern".

Being able to compose functions (for instance turning Action into just an Action is also quite useful in some scenarios.

We should also note Lambda syntax here, because you only get Lambda syntax when you promote functions to first class types. Lambda syntax can be very expressive and concise.

Monads

This is a subtle but very powerful construct. It's as powerful as the yield keyword used to create IEnumerable classes in C#. Essentially it's building a state machine for you under the covers, but your logic looks linear.

Lazy Evaluation & Recursion

I put these together because while they're always lumped in as features of functional programming, they've made their way so quickly into otherwise-imperative languages that it's hard to call them functional anymore.

S-Expressions

I guess I'm not sure where to put this, but the ability to treat the un-compiled code as an object (and inspect/modify it), such as Lisp S-Expressions, or LINQ Expressions, is, in some ways, the most powerful tool of functional programming. Most new .NET "fluent" interfaces, and DSLs, use a combination of lambda syntax and LINQ Expressions to create some very concise APIs. Not to mention Linq2Sql/Linq2Nhibernate where your C# code is "magically" executed as SQL instead of as C# code.

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