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I have a data file that reads

field1 field2 diseased 
discrete discrete   discrete                                                    
                    class
No Yes No 
Yes Yes Yes
No No No

I want to replace No in all columns except the last column with a question mark (?). This is just a toy example with three columns I have data with thousands of columns. So, doing individually will not make sense. Also first three lines are headers and I want them as is. So I want my result to be

field1 field2 diseased 
discrete discrete   discrete                                                    
                    class
? Yes No 
Yes Yes Yes
? ? No

I want to do this without changing the formatting of the file. So far I can do this by deleting the last column and replacing No and again appending the last line but that loses formatting. Also Thanks for the help. In some cases when there are large numbers of Yes and last column is No, some tabs are added in the end. Command

cat -e test 

results in

field1 field2 diseased 
discrete discrete   discrete                                                    
                    class
? Yes No$
Yes Yes Yes
? ? No
Yes Yes No $

I don't want space between last No and $

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Like this, for example:

$ awk 'BEGIN{OFS=FS="\t"} {for (i=1; i<NF; i++) if ($i=="No") $i="?"}1' a
?       Yes     No 
Yes     Yes     Yes
?       ?       No

It checks from 1st to penultimate field and does the replacement if necessary.

BEGIN{OFS=FS="\t"} is used to set the input and output field separator as tab.

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Interestingly, my file is tab delimited and it changes to space delimited file. But the problem is if there is Yes in all columns, tab delimited file stays. Is there an easy way to fix that?? –  lovedynasty Nov 11 '13 at 11:42
    
@lovedynasty BEGIN {FS=OFS="\t"} –  jkshah Nov 11 '13 at 11:45
1  
@jkshah wow, was just updating with this when I saw your commenting it hehe –  fedorqui Nov 11 '13 at 11:46
1  
@lovedynasty I am not going to follow on this unless you give proper explanations. Note both anubhava and me we are checking it and you go from one answer to another trying to figure out things without explaining properly. –  fedorqui Nov 11 '13 at 14:06
1  
Sorry it was problem with the source ... in other cases there aren't, but in all yes cases there are. Sorry !! Now it works –  lovedynasty Nov 11 '13 at 14:09
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Unless you have some other headers which can risk matching No, you should get away with something really simple, such as:

perl -pwe 's/\bNo\b(?!\s*$)/?/g' infile > outfile

Which will replace all No strings that have word boundaries around them. Shell redirection will store the output in a new file. You may also make use of the -i switch, but I normally do not recommend it to new users.

Using a negative lookahead assertion to make sure it is not the last match on the line.

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2  
Doesn't produce desired output. Replaces even in last column. –  jkshah Nov 11 '13 at 11:38
1  
Aha, I did not see that. Well, that is easily fixed. –  TLP Nov 11 '13 at 11:40
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Use awk:

awk -v ccol=3 '{for (i=1; i<=NF; i++) if (i != ccol && $i=="No") $i="?"} 1' OFS='\t' file

You can pass any value for ccol to skip that column to be replaced.

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Interestingly, my file is tab delimited and it changes to space delimited file. But the problem is if there is Yes in all columns, tab delimited file stays. Is there an easy way to fix that?? –  lovedynasty Nov 11 '13 at 11:42
1  
Yes see the edited command now that uses OFS='\t' to make output tab delimited. –  anubhava Nov 11 '13 at 11:43
    
@lovedynasty: Of course this awk command doesn't assume that only last column needs to be skipped since you can pass col # as an argument. –  anubhava Nov 11 '13 at 12:04
    
If there is a column with all yes like and last column No, it adds a tab after No. Otherwise, its fine. Any way to address that? Yes Yes Yes No No Yes No No cat -e file would produce Yes Yes Yes No $ ? Yes ? No$ –  lovedynasty Nov 11 '13 at 13:10
    
Let me try to address that. –  anubhava Nov 11 '13 at 13:18
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Here I consider that the last column mustn't be replaced (this could be easily adapted if necessary).

Using awk :

[ ~]$ awk '{for (i=1;i<NF;i++){if ($i=="No"){$i="?"}}; print $0}' test.txt 
field1 field2 diseased 
discrete discrete   discrete                                                    
                    class
? Yes No
Yes Yes Yes
? ? No

Using sed :

[ ~]$ sed "s/No/\?/g; s/\?\ *$/No/g" test.txt 
field1 field2 diseased 
discrete discrete   discrete                                                    
                class
? Yes No
Yes Yes Yes
? ? No
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Another awk

awk '$1=="No" {$1="?"} $2=="No" {$2="?"} 1' file
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Note there can be way more than 3 columns. –  fedorqui Nov 11 '13 at 11:37
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