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We are developing a new web app and are contemplating using Neo4j. But I am not sure I am happy with using version 2 if it's really a beta version. Is there a stable version 2 somewhere?

Michael D. Spence

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1 Answer 1

If by stable you mean final release, then no, that's expected by end of year. But current milestone is stable enough for you to learn and evaluate Neo4j, and unless your development time frame is very narrow, it is near enough feature complete to start developing against, and just pick up final release in a month or two when available. There are several breaking changes from 1.9, abandoning Java 6 among them, so if you plan to use Neo4j long term you are better off planning your project with 2.0.

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I started learning on version 2 about 6 months ago. However between milestones there were significant enough changes to the REST responses and cypher syntax that I decided to use 1.9 instead, even though I wouldn't be releasing for a while. So something I don't know the answer to but that needs consideration is, does 2.0 beta have the responses and syntax frozen? Next, will the data from 2.0 beta be able to migrate into the release? My data from Milestone 3 wasn't able to go into Milestone 4. Those answers may affect his decision. –  LameCoder Nov 11 '13 at 14:43
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You're right, but your concerns are more relevant for production than for evaluation and early development. I don't work for Neo4j and don't know the answers to your questions. But there's a big difference picking up 'beta' at the beginning or end of the development cycle, and since the Neo4j team are calling 2.0-M5 and on 'near feature complete' I think the general advice is still to start there. –  jjaderberg Nov 11 '13 at 15:40
    
Not sure what changes to the REST api you're thinking of, but that's valid concern if it changes. I wouldn't worry about carrying data though, unless accumulating and shaping data is the big development concern, dev data is usually pretty different from production data–get the plumbing working, then turn on the water. –  jjaderberg Nov 11 '13 at 15:42

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