Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm practicing on writing unit tests for the first time, and I have some questions. I'll start of by explaining what I'm trying to test.

I would like to test a method which looks like this:

public bool IsAdmin(HubCallerContext hubCallerContext)
{
    return hubCallerContext.User.IsInRole("admin");
}

The method is implemented in a class UserService, which is connected to a interface IUserService.

I'm trying to create 2 tests:

  • One with a HubCallerContext which is in the role of "admin" and will assert true.
  • One with a HubCallerContext which is in the role of "user" and will assert false.

I've created a new class library in my solution, where I've refrenced the project I'm testing. I've installed NUnit and Moq, and created a test class which looks like this:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using ChatProj;
using NUnit.Framework;
using ChatProj.Controllers;
using Moq;
using Microsoft.AspNet.SignalR;
using Microsoft.AspNet.SignalR.Hubs;
using ChatProj.DAL;
using ChatProj.Service_Layer;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace ChatProj.Tests
{
    [TestFixture]
    public class Class1
    {

        [SetUp]
        public void Setup()
        {

        }

        [Test]
    public void IsAdmin_CalledByAdmin_ReturnTrue()
    {
        UserService userService = new UserService();
        bool result = userService.IsAdmin( ? );
        Assert.IsTrue( result, "Something is wrong." );
    }

    [Test]
    public void IsAdmin_CalledByUser_ReturnFalse()
    {
        UserService userService = new UserService();
        bool result = userService.IsAdmin( ? );
        Assert.IsFalse( result, "Something is wrong." );
    }

    }
}

Here I start to get confused. (I've marked the parameters of the IsAdmin calls with "?" because I'm not sure what to put there.)

I've read about mocks, stubs, fakes and dummies, but the definitions are to abstract for me to really grasp. I've found these definitions for example:

 - Dummy objects are passed around but never actually used. Usually they are just used to fill parameter lists.

 - Fake objects actually have working implementations, but usually take some shortcut which makes them not suitable for production (an in memory database is a good example).

 - Stubs provide canned answers to calls made during the test, usually not responding at all to anything outside what's programmed in for the test. Stubs may also record information about calls, such as an email gateway stub that remembers the messages it 'sent', or maybe only how many messages it 'sent'.

 - Mocks are objects pre-programmed with expectations which form a specification of the calls they are expected to receive.

As I've designed my test class, I would need some sort of substitution for my HubCallerContext. This is assuming I'm testing the "IsAdmin" method the right way.

So my questions are:

  • Am I testing the "IsAdmin" method in a good way?

  • How would I practically make the tests work? Do I use a mock, and in that case, could you show how I would implement that, or point me in the right direction? Here is how the HubCallerContext works for refrence.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Assuming HubCallerContext is this one - https://github.com/SignalR/SignalR/blob/master/src/Microsoft.AspNet.SignalR.Core/Hubs/HubCallerContext.cs - then setting up the tests will be easy. You just want two mocks of IPrincipal, one of which returns true for the .IsInRole("admin") call and the other that returns false.wrap these two in mocks of IRequest.

The syntax will vary depending on the mocking framework used, but your tests will end up something like:

[Test]
public void IsAdmin_CalledByAdmin_ReturnTrue()
{
    UserService userService = new UserService();
    var principalMock = new Mock<IPrincipal>();
    principalMock.Setup(x => x.IsInRole("admin")).Returns(true);
    var requestMock = new Mock<IRequest>();
    requestMock.Setup(x => x.User).Returns(principalMock.Object);
    var result = userService.IsAdmin(new HubCallerContext(requestMock.Object, ""));
    Assert.IsTrue( result, "Something is wrong." );
}

[Test]
public void IsAdmin_CalledByUser_ReturnFalse()
{
    UserService userService = new UserService();
    var principalMock = new Mock<IPrincipal>();
    principalMock.Setup(x => x.IsInRole("admin")).Returns(false);
    var requestMock = new Mock<IRequest>();
    requestMock.Setup(x => x.User).Returns(principalMock.Object);
    var result = userService.IsAdmin(new HubCallerContext(requestMock.Object, ""));
    Assert.IsFalse( result, "Something is wrong." );
}

I haven't checked if the above compiles, but it is based on the syntax needed for Moq.

share|improve this answer
1  
You've got IsInRole("admin") returning true for both mocks. –  Rob Nov 11 '13 at 15:03
1  
@Rob Well spotted, thanks. –  David Arno Nov 11 '13 at 15:08
    
Cheers for answer mate! Getting this error though: 'Microsoft.AspNet.SignalR.Hubs.HubCallerContext' does not contain a constructor that takes 1 arguments. –  JazzMaster Nov 11 '13 at 15:19
1  
@JazzMaster I forgot the connectionString parameter. I think this can just be set to "" for these tests. Code updated. –  David Arno Nov 11 '13 at 15:34
    
@DavidArno Works great now! Added an edit regarding declaration of UserService and moved a parantheses @ var result = userService.IsAdmin(new HubCallerContext(requestMock.Object, "")); –  JazzMaster Nov 12 '13 at 8:12

I think that it would be much easier for You to write these two unit tests if You would change the method under test a little (assuming it's not a part of legacy code).

If you define the method this way:

public bool IsAdmin(IPrincipal user)
{
    return user.IsInRole("admin");
}

things would get pretty simple (btw. check the "Law of Demeter" ;)). You can pass in a mock object (since the user parameter is an interface - IPrincipal) returning true if the user should be in role "admin" and false otherwise.

The benefit of this solution is that You don't have to build a graph of mock objects and the arrange part of your test is pretty simple. Your tests could look somewhat like this:

    [Test]
    public void IsAdmin_CalledByAdminUser_ReturnTrue()
    {
        //Arrange
        var principalMock = new Mock<IPrincipal>();
        principalMock.Setup(x => x.IsInRole("admin")).Returns(true);

        //Act
        var userService = ...// create an instance of userService here
        var result = userService.IsAdmin(principalMock);

        //Assert
        Assert.IsTrue(result);
    }

    [Test]
    public void IsAdmin_CalledByNonAdminUser_ReturnFalse()
    {
        //Arrange
        var principalMock = new Mock<IPrincipal>();
        principalMock.Setup(x => x.IsInRole("admin")).Returns(false);

        //Act
        var userService = ...// create an instance of userService here
        var result = userService.IsAdmin(principalMock);

        //Assert
        Assert.IsFalse(result);
    }

I would recommend You to read this series of blog posts (I think it's pretty cool :)): http://www.daedtech.com/tag/unit-testing

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, clever! Thanks for sharing this diffrent approach. The blog looks interesting, I'll have to take a look at it :) –  JazzMaster Nov 12 '13 at 8:19

You can get the list of roles and check for each roles using foreach.

share|improve this answer
    
How do you mean? –  JazzMaster Nov 11 '13 at 14:34
    
I mean you can the list of roles from database and call the method IsAdmin() –  somesh Nov 11 '13 at 14:42
    
@somesh That's not really a unit test though, is it? He's looking for examples of using mock objects to mock out the call to the database. –  Matt Jones Nov 11 '13 at 14:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.