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Variables passed to closure by reference. This code:

var figs = ['circle', 'square'];
for (var i in figs) {
    var fig = figs[i];
    document.getElementById(fig).addEventListener("click", function(e) {
        console.log(fig);
    }, false);
}

always log last array element even you click to circle (square, last value of fig variable).

In order to bind actual value of fig variable I use wrapping in function call (so intermediate closure hold loop value):

var figs = ['circle', 'square'];
for (var i in figs) {
    var fig = figs[i];
    document.getElementById(fig).addEventListener("click", (function(fig) {
        return function(e) {
            console.log(fig);
        }
    })(fig), false);
}

Is that possible to avoid wrapping-function in order to pass by value?

UPDATE related questions and answers:

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2  
This is not an issue of how values are passed to functions. JavaScript is always pass-by-value. The issue here is the scope of variables, and specifically that new scopes are only created by function calls. –  Pointy Nov 11 '13 at 15:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No, it is not possible.

However, you can make your code a bit nicer, by taking the code that produces the inner function out of the loop:

var figs = ['circle', 'square'];
function createFigHandler(fig) {
    return function(e) {
        console.log(fig);
    }
}

for (var i = 0; i < figs.length; i++) {
    var fig = figs[i];
    document.getElementById(fig).addEventListener("click", createFigHandler(fig), false);
}

jsFiddle

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Thanks for quick answer! It really look better! +1 –  gavenkoa Nov 11 '13 at 15:18
2  
And he should be using shouldn't be using a for-in loop on arrays. –  0x499602D2 Nov 11 '13 at 15:18
    
@0x499602D2 That's a very good point. Code edited to reflect this. –  lonesomeday Nov 11 '13 at 15:20
    
@0x499602D2 Ok, for-in must be avoided in JS, just need to remember... –  gavenkoa Nov 11 '13 at 15:21
2  
@gavenkoa The for-in should be avoided for arrays only. You only use it if you want to iterate over the key-value pairs of an object. –  0x499602D2 Nov 11 '13 at 15:22

You can also use bind and pass an object that encapsulates the variables you need. Then you can make use of this.fig inside the handler to reference your figure.

document.getElementById(fig).addEventListener("click", (function(e) {
     console.log(this.fig);
}).bind({ fig: fig }), false);

You can also bind a primitive value directly, however it will be wrapped in it's respective object wrapper e.g. Number for a number, String for a string, etc.

document.getElementById(fig).addEventListener("click", (function(e) {
    //this will be the same as new String(fig)
}).bind(fig), false);
share|improve this answer
    
Great technique! Especially for in-lining anonymous functions. It save one level of code indent! +1 –  gavenkoa Nov 11 '13 at 15:46

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