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I created two functions that accept a decimal number and return the binary representation of that number. I chose a simple way to do this by concatenating on 1's and 0's to a string after some simple math. I created a iterative and recursive method to do this. Then I timed the two methods with a timer class my teacher gave me. It turned out that my recursive method was about twice as fast compared to my iterative method. Why would this be the case?

string CConversion::decimalToBinaryIterative(int num)
{
   string ss;
   while(num > 0)
   {
        if  (num%2 != 0)
        {
            ss = '1' + ss;
        }
        else
        {
            ss = '0' + ss;
        }
        num=num/2;
    }
    return ss;
}
string CConversion::decimalToBinaryRecursive(int num)
{
    if(num <= 0)
    { 
        return "";
    } 
    else 
    {
       if  (num%2 != 0)
       {
            return decimalToBinaryRecursive(num/2) + '1';
       }
        else
        {
            return  decimalToBinaryRecursive(num/2) + '0';
        }
    }

}
share|improve this question
    
How do you measure time? Show that part. – deepmax Nov 11 '13 at 15:23
    
Did you measure optimized or debug code? – Dweeberly Nov 11 '13 at 15:25
    
I measured both optimized and debug code. Same results. Optimized was a few magnitudes faster. – theuglymonkey Nov 11 '13 at 15:26
    
Try just comparing two loops that do string = string + '1' and string = '1' + string. – Barmar Nov 11 '13 at 15:27
    
TCO? – dasblinkenlight Nov 11 '13 at 15:27
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Appending a character to a std::string is cheaper than pre-pending one, because appending can be done without copying the string if string's capacity permits you to do so.

Prepending, however, always requires a copy of the entire string.

If you change your iterative code to this

string ss;
while(num > 0)
{
    if  (num%2 != 0)
    {
        ss = ss + '1';
    }
    else
    {
        ss = ss + '0';
    }
    num=num/2;
 }
 return string(ss.rbegin(), ss.rend());

the timing should be nearly the same, or the iterative should become narrowly faster.

share|improve this answer
    
Or use std::reverse(ss.begin(), ss.end()) before returning ss. – Pete Becker Nov 11 '13 at 16:07

The only suspecting part is how you concatenate the strings together:

ss = ss + '1';  // 1

ss = '1' + ss;  // 2

The first one (as the recursive method has) has the chance to not shift all characters and just add a character at the end of the string.

But second one has to shift all characters to the right (or even create a new string).

To solve the issue, use ss += 'x' to concatenate and reverse all string at the end of function.

share|improve this answer
    
@M M. Yup I switched it around and the iterative function showed a faster time. – theuglymonkey Nov 11 '13 at 15:33
    
The problem is, it does not append to the string (as operator+= would) but it has to construct a new string from scratch. So the amount of work necessary should be identical in both cases. – ComicSansMS Nov 11 '13 at 15:37
    
Actually, the only way where the first version would be significantly faster is if the compiler would optimize this to use operator+= instead. In all other cases I would expect both versions to perform pretty much the same (both have to copy n+1 characters to a new string, the only difference being whether you copy the single digit or the multi digit string first). – ComicSansMS Nov 11 '13 at 15:45

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