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I want to build URI (or URL scheme) support in my app.

I do a LSSetDefaultHandlerForURLScheme() in my + (void)initialize and I setted the specific URL schemes also in my info.plist. So I have URL schemes without Apple Script or Apple Events.

When I call myScheme: in my favorit browser the system activates my app.

The problem is, how to handle the schemes when they are called. Or better said: How can I define what my app should do, when myScheme: is called.
Is there a special metod I have to implement or do I have to register one somewhere?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 47 down vote accepted

As you are mentioning AppleScript, I suppose you are working on Mac OS X.
A simple way to register and use a custom URL scheme is to define the scheme in your .plist:

<key>CFBundleURLTypes</key>
<array>
    <dict>
        <key>CFBundleURLName</key>
        <string>URLHandlerTestApp</string>
        <key>CFBundleURLSchemes</key>
        <array>
            <string>urlHandlerTestApp</string>
        </array>
    </dict>
</array>

To register the scheme, put this in your AppDelegate's initialization:

[[NSAppleEventManager sharedAppleEventManager] setEventHandler:self andSelector:@selector(handleURLEvent:withReplyEvent:) forEventClass:kInternetEventClass andEventID:kAEGetURL];

Whenever your application gets activated via URL scheme, the defined selector gets called.

A stub for the event-handling method, that shows how to get the URL string:

- (void)handleURLEvent:(NSAppleEventDescriptor*)event withReplyEvent:(NSAppleEventDescriptor*)replyEvent
{
    NSString* url = [[event paramDescriptorForKeyword:keyDirectObject] stringValue];
    NSLog(@"%@", url);
}

Apple's documentation: Installing a Get URL Handler

Update
I just noticed a problem for sandboxed apps that install the event handler in applicationDidFinishLaunching:. With enabled sandboxing, the handler method doesn't get called when the app is launched by clicking a URL that uses the custom scheme.
By installing the handler a bit earlier, in applicationWillFinishLaunching:, the method gets called as expected:

- (void)applicationWillFinishLaunching:(NSNotification *)aNotification
{
    [[NSAppleEventManager sharedAppleEventManager] setEventHandler:self andSelector:@selector(handleURLEvent:withReplyEvent:) forEventClass:kInternetEventClass andEventID:kAEGetURL];
}

- (void)handleURLEvent:(NSAppleEventDescriptor*)event withReplyEvent:(NSAppleEventDescriptor*)replyEvent
{
    NSString* url = [[event paramDescriptorForKeyword:keyDirectObject] stringValue];
    NSLog(@"%@", url);
}

On the iPhone, the easiest way to handle URL-scheme activation is, to implement UIApplicationDelegate's application:handleOpenURL: - Documentation

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Stupid question, but where exactly is the AppDelegate's intialization? Which method? –  Thomas Jul 27 '12 at 17:58
    
What is keyDirectObject and where is it defined? I don't understand what the value of keyDirectObject is supposed to be. Thanks. –  Joel Nov 19 at 22:53
    
For those that are wondering like me, "How does keyDirectObject compile without syntax error for a missing symbol?", it's defined in AE/AppleEvents.h as an enum case. Somehow AE/AppleEvents.h gets included in your app even if you don't directly include it. –  Joel Nov 19 at 23:05

The problem is, how to handle the schemes when they are called.

That's where the Apple Events come in. When Launch Services wants your app to open a URL, it sends your app a kInternetEventClass/kAEGetURL event.

The Cocoa Scripting Guide uses this very task as an example of installing an event handler.

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You can define the “get URL” command in a scripting terminology SDEF and implement the corresponding method. For example, Terminal’s SDEF contains the following command definition for handling URLs

<command name="get URL" code="GURLGURL" description="Open a command an ssh, telnet, or x-man-page URL." hidden="yes">
    <direct-parameter type="text" description="The URL to open." />
</command>

and declares that the application responds to it:

<class name="application" code="capp" description="The application's top-level scripting object.">
    <cocoa class="TTApplication"/>
    <responds-to command="get URL">
        <cocoa method="handleGetURLScriptCommand:" />
    </responds-to>
</class>

The TTApplication class (a subclass of NSApplication) defines the method:

- (void)handleGetURLScriptCommand:(NSScriptCommand *)command { … }
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