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How can I use reflection to pass each list of "MyTypes" to a generic method with a constraint of T:MyDataObject?

public interface IAllMyTypes
{
    List<FirstType> MyType1 { get; set; }
    List<SecondType> MyType2 { get; set; }
    List<ThirdType> MyType3 { get; set; }
}

FirstType, SecondType, and ThirdType inherit from MyDataObject (as demonstrated below), but have different properties.

public class FirstType : MyDataObject
{
  //various properties
}   

I've been unable to pass the data into a method with this signature:

void DoSomething<T>(IEnumerable<T> enumerable) where T : MyDataObject;

The error is that "type arguments can not be inferred."

Here is my unsuccessful attempt:

public void DoSomethingWithAllMyTypes(IAllMyTypes allMyTypes)
{
    foreach (PropertyInfo propertyInfo in allMyTypes.GetType().GetProperties())
    {
        var x = propertyInfo.GetValue(allMyTypes) as IList;//im not sure what to do here
        if(x==null) throw new Exception("still wrong");

        DoSomething(x);
    }
}   

All of the code in DoSomething(..) works correctly if I provide the properties directly which looks like:

public void DoSomethingWithAllMyTypes(IAllMyTypes allMyTypes)
{
    DoSomething(allMyTypes.MyType1);
    DoSomething(allMyTypes.MyType2);
    DoSomething(allMyTypes.MyType3);
}
share|improve this question
    
IList (non-generic) would work fine. –  SLaks Nov 11 '13 at 16:27
    
If the only reason you're doing these steps is to call DoSomething multiple times, consider a data structure like List<Type> typelist = new List<Type> { typeof(A), typeof(B), typeof(C) }; rather than your your IAllMyTypes. Then you could iterate over that, and change the function signature of DoSomething. –  Matt Cruikshank Nov 11 '13 at 17:06
    
Should it be allMyTypes.GetType().GetProperties() or do you want typeof(IAllMyTypes).GetProperties() –  Bob Vale Nov 11 '13 at 17:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want to use reflection, you can invoke your helper method using reflection, too:

You will have to obtain a MethodInfo to a generic method and create a generic method reflection handle to actually Invoke the method. The type T of the generic method needs to be obtained at runtime in that case.

public void DoSomethingWithAllMyTypes(IAllMyTypes allMyTypes)
{
    var method = this.GetType().GetMethod("DoSomething", BindingFlags.DeclaredOnly | BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public);
    foreach (PropertyInfo propertyInfo in allMyTypes.GetType().GetProperties())
    {
        var x = propertyInfo.GetValue(allMyTypes, null);
        if(x==null) throw new Exception("still wrong");

        // obtain the type from the property - other techniques can be used here.
        var genericMethod = method.MakeGenericMethod(new[] {propertyInfo.PropertyType.GetGenericArguments()[0]})
        //execute the generic helper
        genericMethod.Invoke(this, new[]{x});
    }
} 

public void DoSomething<T>(IList<T> list) where T : MyDataObject {

}
share|improve this answer
    
Dropped this in and worked first shot! This is exactly it. Thank you so much. –  user2565663 Nov 11 '13 at 17:47
    
Not sure if this needs a whole new question, but I'm doing something similar elsewhere with a method DoSomethingElse(IEnumerable<MyDataObject> list) and I am attempting to pass to the same DoSomething method from earlier, however, I am getting an error: Object of type 'System.Collections.Generic.List1[MyDataObject]' cannot be converted to type 'System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable1[FirstType]'. I tried to modify the above example to do it, but clearly I have something wrong. –  user2565663 Nov 11 '13 at 19:59

I'm struggling to find a case where you'd need to structure your data the way you did without over-complicating things. If you've found a legit case please comment and I'll update my answer to reflect your needs.

You can start with your base class, make it abstract and put an abstract method in it DoSomething

public abstract class MyDataObject{
  public string SomeSharedProperty{get;set;}
  protected abstract DoSomething(); 
}

public class FirstType: MyDataObject{ 
  protected override DoSomething(){
    Console.WriteLine(SomeSharedProperty);
  }
}


public class Consumer{
  public void DoSomethingWithAllMyTypes(List<MyDataObject> source)
  {
    source.ForEach(x=>x.DoSomething());
  }
}
share|improve this answer

You could use the Linq method call Cast<T> to convert your list to the right type

public void DoSomethingWithAllMyTypes(IAllMyTypes allMyTypes)
{
    foreach (PropertyInfo propertyInfo in allMyTypes.GetType().GetProperties())
    {
        var x = propertyInfo.GetValue(allMyTypes) as IEnumerable
        if(x==null) throw new Exception("still wrong");

        DoSomething(x.Cast<MyDataObject>());
    }
}  
share|improve this answer
    
This does not work because the type of T in DoSomething is "MyDataObject" instead of whatever the real type is such as FirstType, SecondType, etc which causes the reflection in that code to only have access to the members of MyDataObject. –  user2565663 Nov 11 '13 at 18:03
1  
@user2565663 No that is not true, reflection wouldn't care, because GetType would return the true type. –  Bob Vale Nov 11 '13 at 19:34
    
I've run this example and that is not what is happening. Can you share some code that shows what you're saying is true? When I am inside of DoSomething T is a MyDataObject and I don't know how you would be able to GetType on that and get a different type. –  user2565663 Nov 11 '13 at 19:48
1  
@user2565663 inside DoSomething<T>(T value): typeof(T) will return MyDataObject however value.GetType() will return the true type of value regardless of how you've cast it. For example try having an object in variable x that is of type FirstType and then call DoSomething((MyDataObject)x) –  Bob Vale Nov 11 '13 at 19:52
1  
@user2565663 If you are using reflection then you really shouldn't be using generics, generics are really for non reflection based approaches where you need to return the original type or at compile time need the absolute type. Your code would function just as well if you made DoSomething non generic accepting an object of type MyDataObject and using GetType on the value (after checking its not null!) –  Bob Vale Nov 12 '13 at 9:42

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