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I am trying to detect lines, circles and arcs in a simple black and white drawing image file (jpg or bmp format)

I posted a similar question before, in which OpenCV library was suggested. It is a good library, however, it is not accurate enough for my purpose. More specifically, the Canny detection algorithm somehow does not work perfectly for my images.

Hence I am trying to implement the algorithm myself using QImage. I have managed to successfully implement it for straight lines. The code in Qt C++ is as follows. It is a very cluttered code, but I am just giving it for reference.

The algorithm is very simple:
1. I scan the image from top left, row-wise.
2. Whenever I encounter a black pixel, I scan towards its right, left bottom to check whether it is a corner of a line segment.

for ( int i = 0; i < myImage.height(); i++ ) {

        for ( int j = 0; j < myImage.width(); j++ ) {
            if ( qGray( myImage.pixel( j, i ) ) == 0 ) {

                myImage.setPixel( j, i, value );
                bool horiLineDrawn = false;
                int xRight = j+1, xLeft = j-1;
                int y = i+1;
                while ( xRight < myImage.width() && qGray( myImage.pixel( xRight, i ) ) == 0 ) {
                    myImage.setPixel( xRight, i, value );
                    xRight++;
                }
                while ( y < myImage.height() && xLeft >= 0 &&
                        qGray( myImage.pixel( xLeft, y ) ) == 0 ) {
                    if ( xLeft - 1 >= 0 &&
                         qGray( myImage.pixel( xLeft - 1, y ) ) == 0 ) {
                        while ( xLeft >= 0 &&
                                qGray( myImage.pixel( xLeft, y ) ) == 0 ) {
                            myImage.setPixel( xLeft, y, value );
                            xLeft--;
                        }
                        y++;
                    } else if ( y+1 < myImage.height() &&
                                qGray( myImage.pixel( xLeft, y + 1 ) ) == 0 ) {
                        while ( y < myImage.height() &&
                                qGray( myImage.pixel( xLeft, y ) ) == 0 ) {
                            myImage.setPixel( xLeft, y, value );
                            y++;
                        }
                        xLeft--;
                    } else {
                        xLeft--;
                        y++;
                    }
                }
                y--;
                xLeft++;
                if ( y > i && ( y - i > MIN_PIXELS_LINE ||
                                xRight-1 - xLeft > MIN_PIXELS_LINE )
                     ) {
                    drawFile.Line( fileName2, xRight-1, myImage.height() - i, xLeft,
                                   myImage.height() - y, 0 );
                    horiLineDrawn = true;
                }

                y = i + 1;
                while ( y < myImage.height() && xRight < myImage.width() &&
                        qGray( myImage.pixel( xRight, y ) ) == 0 ) {


                    if ( xRight + 1 < myImage.width() &&
                         qGray( myImage.pixel( xRight + 1, y ) ) == 0 ) {
                        while ( xRight < myImage.width() &&
                                qGray( myImage.pixel( xRight, y ) ) == 0 ) {
                            myImage.setPixel( xRight, y, value );
                            xRight++;
                        }
                        y++;
                    } else if ( y+1 < myImage.height() &&
                                qGray( myImage.pixel( xRight, y + 1 ) ) == 0 ) {
                        while ( y < myImage.height() &&
                                qGray( myImage.pixel( xRight, y ) ) == 0 ) {
                            myImage.setPixel( xRight, y, value );
                            y++;
                        }
                        xRight++;
                    } else {
                        xRight++;
                        y++;
                    }
                }
                y--;
                xRight--;
                if ( y - i > MIN_PIXELS_LINE || xRight - j > MIN_PIXELS_LINE
                     && !horiLineDrawn) {
                    drawFile.Line( fileName2, j, myImage.height() - i, xRight,
                                   myImage.height() - y, 0 );
                    horiLineDrawn = true;
                }

                y = i + 1;
                while ( y < myImage.height() && qGray( myImage.pixel( j, y ) ) == 0 ) {
                    myImage.setPixel( j, y, value );
                    y++;
                }
                xLeft = j - 1;
                xRight = j + 1;
                if ( xLeft >= 0 && y < myImage.height() &&
                     qGray( myImage.pixel( xLeft, y ) ) == 0 ) {
                    while ( xLeft >= 0 && y < myImage.height() &&
                            qGray( myImage.pixel( xLeft, y ) ) == 0 ) {
                        while ( y < myImage.height() &&
                                qGray( myImage.pixel( xLeft, y ) ) == 0 ) {
                            myImage.setPixel( xLeft, y, value );
                            y++;
                        }
                        xLeft--;
                    }
                    xLeft++;
                    y--;
                    if ( y - i > MIN_PIXELS_LINE || j - xLeft > MIN_PIXELS_LINE )
                        drawFile.Line( fileName2, j, myImage.height() - i, xLeft,
                                       myImage.height() - y, 0 );
                } else if ( xRight < myImage.width() && y < myImage.height() &&
                            qGray( myImage.pixel( xRight, y ) ) == 0 ) {
                       while ( xRight < myImage.width() && y < myImage.height() &&
                               qGray( myImage.pixel( xRight, y ) ) == 0 ) {
                           while ( y < myImage.height() &&
                                   qGray( myImage.pixel( xRight, y ) ) == 0 ) {
                               myImage.setPixel( xRight, y, value );
                               y++;
                           }
                           xRight++;
                       }
                       xRight--;
                       y--;
                       if ( y - i > MIN_PIXELS_LINE || xRight - j > MIN_PIXELS_LINE )
                           drawFile.Line( fileName2, j, myImage.height() - i, xRight,
                                          myImage.height() - y, 0 );
                } else {
                    y--;
                    if ( y - i > MIN_PIXELS_LINE )
                        drawFile.Line( fileName2, j, myImage.height() - i, j,
                                       myImage.height() - y, 0 );
                }


            }
        }
    }

This works fine. For example:

Input image:
enter image description here

Output image:
enter image description here

Can anyone suggest how I can implement similar or better algorithm for circles and arcs? Efficiency is not a problem since my image size shall be maximum 1000 by 1000 pixels. However, accuracy is critical.

EDIT: There may be a lot of bugs in my present implementation of straight lines, like I haven't tested it for intersecting lines etc. But I think I shall be able to manage those complications.

share|improve this question
    
Hmm...well, this wouldn't be faster, but following along the same lines (no pun intended) as your previous solution, you could look for a black pixel, then look around it for other black pixels. Once you have three points which are connected but aren't in a line, you should be able to calculate the radius of the circle, or (for a quadratic) the focii (or whatever you need) –  Brian Gradin Nov 11 '13 at 18:22
    
@BrianGradin thanks for your response. Actually the problem comes because the lines and circles are represented by discrete pixels. So you're suggesting I extend this same idea for circles as well. Hmmm... Seems scary but I'll try it. –  user1990169 Nov 11 '13 at 18:30
    
Have you looked at HoughLines and HoughCircles in OpenCV? –  beaker Nov 11 '13 at 18:32
    
@beaker yes I have tried opencv houghlines for my lines. However when combined with the canny edge detection algorithm it does not seem to produce very accurate results. It skips some lines. Any idea on how to improve it? –  user1990169 Nov 11 '13 at 18:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Out of curiosity, are all of your images binary with thin lines? Are these scanned hand drawings or pixel art? I ask because you will run into trouble using JPEG compression, it is notoriously bad on line art. You should make sure you are always using a lossless compression with line drawings.

If there is noise and other artifacts in the image, it is highly unlikely that any edge detector is going to be perfect. If I was attacking this problem I would focus on pre-processing the data to make it have stronger lines so that the line detection process is easier. This could be done by pre-thresholding the image, possibly doing some morphological clean-up, or even sharpening the image.

Also, if your images are already binary (or could be made binary with a simple threshold), the Canny edge detection (or really any grayscale edge detector) might not be the best tool to use. You would be better off making your imagery binary and using something like findContours to identify the edges.

If you are looking for something slightly different than the Hough transform for identifying shapes, you could try using a model fitting algorithm such as RANSAC.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, all my images are greyscale, however, you are right, they shall have lines of varying intensities. At present I am cleaning up each pixel by just observing the pixel greyscale and either make it full black or make it full white according to a partition that I have set. Any other techniques to pre-process data shall be very helpful. Thanks! –  user1990169 Nov 12 '13 at 4:45
    
Also, what is JPEG compression? My images shall be generated by convertor softwares or paper scans of engineering drawings. –  user1990169 Nov 12 '13 at 4:46
    
When an image is saved in JPEG format, the format is actually a lossless compression routine, so @DavidNilosek is saying that if the images are saved and loaded back in before processing, you're likely to have artifacts from the compression that would stop you having clean black and white contrasting colours. –  TheDarkKnight Nov 12 '13 at 9:14
    
I think @Merlin069 meant lossy compression routine, but yes exactly. Particularly in the JPEG format due to the nature of the compression algorithm itself, it produces many artifacts along high contrast edges (check out artifacts here: stat.columbia.edu/~jakulin/jpeg/artifacts.htm). Many OCR techniques use morphological image processing as a pre-processing step to clean up the data. It heavily depends on your input data, but something as simple as a morphological opening operation can significantly clean up a thresholded image. –  David Nilosek Nov 12 '13 at 14:35

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