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Many years ago I used d32 which was available for DOS and Linux.

Is a non-GUI visual diff available for Linux like this one?

Any others than Vim and Emacs (Vim and Emacs are too powerful :-) )

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8 Answers

I'm using vimdiff. Or there is also sdiff.

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sdiff seems nice, but is there any variation of it that supports coloured output? –  Hugo Jun 13 '13 at 5:09
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vimdiff look really good. –  Trismegistos Mar 4 at 9:58
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You can try ColorDiff.

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Works well but color output is lost when piping through less. Use less -r to keep the colors. –  SabreWolfy Jan 16 '12 at 15:22
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Vim comes with vimdiff which works pretty well...

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awesome, found this searching. just what I was looking for. –  David Oct 21 '11 at 21:54
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vimdiff will do what you want. Vim is installed by default on most linux distros, so you probably do not even need to install anything.

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Personally I like to use vimdiff. But if you don't know vim that won't be that helpful to you.

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Your title mentions "Linux console" but your question mentions meld, which is a GUI application. It might help answerers if you could clarify this.

In GUI apps, meld is still pretty much the standard. It works well, it's reasonably pretty and intuitive.

If you're really limited to using the console (i.e. text-only) then apart from the diff utilities built into editors like vim and emacs you could also try the original command line utility diff. I find it very useful to use the -y option to display files side-by-side, and there are other options I've used to display "unified" diffs and to precisely set the amount of context around matched differences. If you pipe diff's output into less you can browse with fair convenience.

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Thanks Cral, the problem is not relate to limited to using the console,I'm prefer using console mode :-) –  leedit Jan 4 '10 at 0:46
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If you're comfortable with git, you can also use git diff to generate a path for you. It'll usually give you nice colors, page to less, and output the unified diff format by default. It'll work regardless of whether the files are part of a git repository.

git diff -- file.a file.b

If file.a and file.b reside in a git repo and are untracked, you'll need do supply --no-index:

git diff --no-index -- file.a file.b

because git will diff against the index by default.

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Emacs has a built-in visual diff tool: M-x ediff.

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