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I'm having trouble wrapping my thoughts about class inheritance. I'm suppsed to create a dashboard like interface in a app, and I'll have maybe 10 widgets/dashlets on that dashboard view. All those dashlets/widgets will have basically same look, with a title on the top, borders, row of buttons on the top and a graph. Let's say I create a subclass of UI View called 'Dashlet' with properties and outlets, and create XIB file with proper layout and connected outlets etc.

Now I want to create several subclasses of that 'Dashlet' view that will only process data differently, and draw different graphs. My current code looks something like this:

Dashlet.h

@interface Dashlet : UIView{
@private
    UILabel *title;
    UIView *controls;
    UIView *graph;    
}
@property (weak, nonatomic) IBOutlet UILabel *title;
@property (weak, nonatomic) IBOutlet UIView *controls;
@property (weak, nonatomic) IBOutlet UIView *graph;

-(Dashlet*)initWithParams:(NSMutableDictionary *)params;
-(void)someDummyMethod;
@end

And in Dashlet.m

- (id) init {
    self = [super init];
    //Basic empty init...
    return self;
}

- (id)initWithFrame:(CGRect)frame
{
    self = [super initWithFrame:frame];
    if (self) {

    }
    return self;
}

-(id)initWithParams:(NSMutableDictionary *)params
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        self = [[[NSBundle mainBundle] loadNibNamed:@"Dashlet" owner:nil options:nil] lastObject];
        //some init code
    }
    return self;
}

Now let's say that I create a subclass called CustomDashlet.h:

@interface CustomDashlet : Dashlet
@property (nonatomic, strong) NSString* test;
-(void)testMethod;
-(void)someDummyMethod;
@end

and CustomDashlet.m

-(id)init{
    return self;
}

- (id)initWithFrame:(CGRect)frame
{
    self = [super initWithFrame:frame];
    if (self) {

    }
    return self;
}

-(id)initWithParams:(NSMutableDictionary *)parameters
{
   self = [super initWithParams:parameters];
   if (self) {
      //do some stuff 
   }
   return self;
}

This, kind of works, but I need to override some of the methods declared in the superclass or even add some of my own. Whenever i try to do something like this in CustomDashlet.m

[self someDummyMethod] or even [self testMethod] I get an exception error like this:

NSInvalidArgumentException', reason: '-[Dashlet testMethod]: unrecognized selector sent to instance 

Am I even doing this right? Did I miss something? Am I supposed to make this work in some other way? If anyone has suggestions, please feel free to share your thoughts, thank you for all the help.

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3  
Do you have concrete implementations of someDummyMethod and testMethod? –  jszumski Nov 11 '13 at 18:29
    
Where is implementation of [self someDummyMethod] and [self testMethod] methods? –  Tirth Nov 11 '13 at 18:29
    
Not a duplicate, but your question is answered here: stackoverflow.com/questions/19451744/… –  nhgrif Nov 11 '13 at 18:34
    
@jszumski Well, the someDummyMehod is implemented in superclass, and it looks as even though I override it in subclass, a superclass implementation code gets called. Test method is a method I don't have in superclass, only in subclass, and whenever it gets called, i get exception that no 'testMethod' method found in superclass. –  Slavenko Miljic Nov 11 '13 at 18:40
1  
@SlavenkoMiljic: The exception method -[Dashlet testMethod]: unrecognized selector clearly indicates that self in [self testMethod] is a Dashlet, and not a * CustomDashlet* as you expect. You should provide a small self-contained example demonstrating the problem, in particular show how the object is created. –  Martin R Nov 11 '13 at 18:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is that

SalesDashlet *sales = [[SalesDashlet alloc] initWithParams:nil];

does not return a SalesDashlet instance, as expected, but a Dashlet instance. Here is what happens:

  • [SalesDashlet alloc] allocates an instance of SalesDashlet.
  • The subclass implementation of initWithParams: is called with this instance, and calls self = [super initWithParams:parameters].
  • The superclass implementation of initWithParams discards self and overwrites it with a new instance loaded from the Nib file. This is an instance of Dashlet.
  • This new instance is returned.

Therefore SalesDashlet *sales is "only" a Dashlet, and calling any subclass method on it throws an "unknown selector" exception.

You cannot change the type of objects loaded in the Nib file. You could create a second Nib file containing a SalesDashlet object. If the main purpose of the subclass is to add additional methods, then the easiest solution would be to add these methods in a Category of the Dashlet class.

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Yeah, the more I think about it, the more I realize that this is the way to go, and I got things set up the wrong way in the first place. Once again, thank you for the help, hopefully this will be more than enough to get me started. –  Slavenko Miljic Nov 11 '13 at 21:36
1  
How many variations of the same answer did you need before you finally tried it out? –  Infinity James Nov 12 '13 at 8:28

If the problem is with the

- (Dashlet *)initWithParams:

method it is because the base class declares it with a Dashlet return value, whereas the subclass is redeclaring it with a SalesDashlet return instance.

Always use instancetype as the return type for any init method.

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1  
I'm pretty sure id should be the return type for init methods, and instanceType should be the return type for factory methods. –  nhgrif Nov 11 '13 at 18:36
    
@nhgrif: instancetype is OK for init methods. And even if you declare -(id)initXXX, the Clang compiler silently assumes -(instancetype)initXXX. –  Martin R Nov 11 '13 at 18:39
    
As Martin R says, the compiler is assuming (instancetype) when you put id in an init method anyway; so just put instancetype in and be explicit. –  Infinity James Nov 11 '13 at 18:42
1  
Declaring the return type correctly (e.g. as instancetype) helps the compiler to find errors. But it does not change the actual returned value. –  Martin R Nov 11 '13 at 18:56
1  
@InfinityJames: I think your other (currently deleted) answer goes into the right direction. initWithParams: in the subclass calls [super initWithParams:], and initWithParams: in the superclass explicitly loads a Dashlet instance from the Nib file. –  Martin R Nov 11 '13 at 19:51

I believe you simply need to change following line in your Dashlet.h file:

-(Dashlet*)initWithParams:(NSMutableDictionary *)params;

to following:

-(id)initWithParams:(NSMutableDictionary *)params;

or better:

-(instancetype)initWithParams:(NSMutableDictionary *)params;
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately no change. The problem appears to be somewhere in the line self = [[[NSBundle mainBundle] loadNibNamed:@"Dashlet" owner:nil options:nil] lastObject] –  Slavenko Miljic Nov 11 '13 at 19:37
    
Is your nib file owner set to `CustomDashlet' class? Without that you can not access methods in this class. –  Yas T. Nov 11 '13 at 21:19

You need to change your init methods.

-(Dashlet*)initWithParams:(NSMutableDictionary *)params
-(SalesDashlet*)initWithParams:(NSMutableDictionary *)parameters

The return type on both of these should be id.

The problem you're running into is similar to trying to do this:

NSMutableArray *someArray = [[NSArray alloc] init];

Despite declaring someArray as an NSMutableArray, you've initialized it as an NSArray, and as such, someArray will actually be an immutable NSArray.

So because your SalesDashlet init method calls its super init method and the super explicitly returns an object of type Dashlet, then the SalesDashlet will also return an object of type Dashlet, so you're trying to call testMethod (a method that only exists in SalesDashlet) on an object of type Dashlet (which doesn't know about the testMethod method).

Changing your return type to id will make the methods return an object of the right type.


As a note, you've done your init, and initWithFrame methods correctly.

SalesDashlet *mySalesDashlet = [[SalesDashlet alloc] initWithFrame:someFrame];

Creating a SalesDashlet in this way will allow you to call [mySalesDashlet testMethod].

Your initWithFrame has return type of id in both super and sub classes.

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1  
I do not think so. How the return type is declared is only relevant to the compiler. I might be wrong, but I cannot imagine how a "wrong declaration" could cause a runtime exception. –  Martin R Nov 11 '13 at 18:44
1  
The exception doesn't happen until he tries calling the method on an object that doesn't know that method. I've run into similar issues (in a comment to the question, I posted a link to a question I asked myself where I was seeing similar issues). –  nhgrif Nov 11 '13 at 18:46
1  
@nhgrif Nah it was a joke. I just don't like to add 'haha' or 'lol' to things I say. You're right, the extra detail is a nice addition, I'd sort of like to know from the guy whether this is the solution or not though because his question was pretty unclear. –  Infinity James Nov 11 '13 at 18:52
1  
@SlavenkoMiljic Hang on... have you included SalesDashlet's init methods in the SalesDashlet.h? And changed the Dashlet.h header to correct the return type for the init method? –  nhgrif Nov 11 '13 at 18:53
2  
@nhgrif: Changing the (declaration of the) return type does not change the returned object in any way. - But the failure of a designated initialized (as in the question that you linked to) might be a problem. –  Martin R Nov 11 '13 at 18:55

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