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I need to count the number of files deleted in this recursive function. Since it's recursive I cannot use if statements, and C# does not support global variables. Any alternatives?

static void DirSearch(string path)
{
    try
    {
        foreach (string dirPath in Directory.GetDirectories(path))
        {
            foreach (string filePath in Directory.GetFiles(dirPath))
            {
                string filename = Path.GetFileName(filePath);
                if (filename.Equals("desktop.txt"))
                {
                    File.Delete(filePath);
                    //count++
                }
                Console.WriteLine(filePath); // print files
            }
            Console.WriteLine(dirPath); // print directories
            DirSearch(dirPath);
        }
    }
    catch (System.Exception excpt)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(excpt.Message);
    }
}
share|improve this question
2  
of course C# supports global variables. where did you get the idea it does not?! also, ever thought of passing in an extra parameter to keep hold of the number of files deleted? add an extra param to your method for the counter. – Ahmed ilyas Nov 11 '13 at 18:43
    
@Ahmedilyas Technically it doesn't they're all members of some type or another. – Lloyd Nov 11 '13 at 18:47
    
As an aside, I would rename the function. A search implies that it will traverse a data source and return information about it, but the function is deleting all desktop.txt files. It would probably also be worth adding a parameter for filename rather than hard-coding it to desktop.txt. – Dan Lyons Nov 11 '13 at 19:06
    
@DanLyons: agreed! this code was just to illustrate the problem – SharkTiles Nov 11 '13 at 19:16
up vote 7 down vote accepted

One way is to pass in something for it to count into. I'd do this using ref, for example:

static void DirSearch(string path, ref int count)
{
    try
    {
        foreach (string dirPath in Directory.GetDirectories(path))
        {
            foreach (string filePath in Directory.GetFiles(dirPath))
            {
                string filename = Path.GetFileName(filePath);
                if (filename.Equals("desktop.txt"))
                {
                    File.Delete(filePath);
                    count++
                }
                Console.WriteLine(filePath); // print files
            }
            Console.WriteLine(dirPath); // print directories
            DirSearch(dirPath,ref count);
        }
    }
    catch (System.Exception excpt)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(excpt.Message);
    }
}

Then call it:

int count = 0;

DirSearch(@"C:\SomePath",ref count);

Then you can use count as normal as you had commented out in your code.

share|improve this answer
    
need to pass ref count as an argument to the recursive call to DirSearch – Sam Pearson Nov 11 '13 at 18:48
    
@SamPearson Oops missed that you're right, fixed. – Lloyd Nov 11 '13 at 18:49
1  
Why ref when you can return the number of directories affected? – Romoku Nov 11 '13 at 18:50
    
+1. Returning number of processed files would be much cleaner than ref. – Alexei Levenkov Nov 11 '13 at 18:50
    
You're right you could also do a return like @wdosanjos answer, entirely down to what you prefer, I've upvoted his answer as well. – Lloyd Nov 11 '13 at 18:52

Try a recursive count as follows. So DirSearch returns the count of deleted files.

static int DirSearch(string path)
{
    int count = 0;

    try
    {
        foreach (string dirPath in Directory.GetDirectories(path))
        {
            foreach (string filePath in Directory.GetFiles(dirPath))
            {
                string filename = Path.GetFileName(filePath);
                if (filename.Equals("desktop.txt"))
                {
                    File.Delete(filePath);

                    count++;
                }
                Console.WriteLine(filePath); // print files
            }
            Console.WriteLine(dirPath); // print directories
            count += DirSearch(dirPath);
        }
    }
    catch (System.Exception excpt)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(excpt.Message);
    }

    return count;
}
share|improve this answer

Without a ref variable (so you don't need to pass something that is correctly initialized):

static int DirSearch(string path)
{
    try
    {
        int count = 0;
        foreach (string dirPath in Directory.GetDirectories(path))
        {
            foreach (string filePath in Directory.GetFiles(dirPath))
            {
                string filename = Path.GetFileName(filePath);
                if (filename.Equals("desktop.txt"))
                {
                    File.Delete(filePath);
                    count++;
                }
                Console.WriteLine(filePath); // print files
            }
            Console.WriteLine(dirPath); // print directories
            count += DirSearch(dirPath);
        }
        return count;
    }
    catch (System.Exception excpt)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(excpt.Message);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Did You also consider a non-recursive solution like presented here? http://stackoverflow.com/a/929418/2979680

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