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This question already has an answer here:

The following alerts 2 every time.

function timer() {
    for (var i = 0; i < 3; ++i) {
        var j = i;
        setTimeout(function () {
            alert(j);
        }, 1000);
    }
}

timer();

Shouldn't var j = i; set the j into the individual scope of the setTimeout?

Whereas if I do this:

function timer() {
    for (var i = 0; i < 3; ++i) {
        (function (j) {
            setTimeout(function () {
                alert(j);
            }, 1000);
        })(i);
    }
}

timer();

It alerts 0, 1, 2 like it should.

Is there something I am missing?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by VisioN, bfavaretto, Code Lღver, Qantas 94 Heavy, Sirko May 5 '14 at 6:53

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
"like it should" - did you mean "like I want it to"? :) – ithcy Nov 11 '13 at 19:19
    
@ithcy I guess haha – Neal Nov 11 '13 at 19:19
1  
You are only missing, that Javascript is broken as hell, I had the exact same WTF moment about a week ago … :( – filmor Nov 11 '13 at 19:19
1  
@Neal Well, I personally see that j is not initialized in the scope of setTimeout but in the scope of timer function, whereas in the second example you create an anonymous function, where you pass i, implicitly initialising j in the scope of closure. This creates and executes 3 functional blocks, setting 3 timeouts at once. – VisioN Nov 11 '13 at 19:27
2  
It surprises me that someone who has answered over 1000 JavaScript/jQuery questions doesn't know how variable scope works in the language. – Blue Skies Nov 11 '13 at 19:41
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Javascript has function scope. This means that

for(...) {
    var j = i;
}

is equivalent to

var j;
for(...) {
    j = i;
}

In fact, this is how Javascript compilers will actually treat this code. And, of course, this causes your little "trick" to fail, because j will be incremented before the function in setTimeout gets called, i.e. j now doesn't really do anything different than i, it's just an alias with the same scope.

If Javascript were to have block scope, your trick would work, because j would be a new variable within every iteration.

What you need to do is create a new scope:

for(var i = ...) {
    (function (j) {
        // you can safely use j here now
        setTimeout(...);
    })(i);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Is there any way to prevent the code from defining it like this? – Neal Nov 11 '13 at 19:20
    
Just edited a pseudo-code solution in. – Ingo Bürk Nov 11 '13 at 19:21
    
Haha that is basically what I do in the end of my OP.... silly hacks. – Neal Nov 11 '13 at 19:22
    
@Neal You edited that last part into your question, didn't you? Because if not, I must be really blind to not have seen it when writing my answer. – Ingo Bürk Nov 11 '13 at 19:23
    
@IngoBürk Nope. That was there the whole time. That was the whole point of my question... If that was the only way to do it. – Neal Nov 11 '13 at 19:24

An alternative is to use the (normally abused) keyword with:

function timer() {
    for (var i = 0; i < 3; ++i) {
        with({j: i}) {
            setTimeout(function () {
                alert(j);
            }, 1000);
        }
    }
}

timer();

It creates a new scope like functions do, but without the awkward syntax. I first saw it here: Are there legitimate uses for JavaScript's “with” statement?

share|improve this answer
    
I like that you gave a with example, but it doesn't create a scope "like functions do". There are important differences, which led to its removal from "strict mode". – Blue Skies Nov 11 '13 at 19:42
    
@BlueSkies Pseudo-scope, then. For the most part with practical use, it acts like it does. – Izkata Nov 11 '13 at 19:49

The alternative the the IIFE is a function factory:

function timer() {
    for (var i = 0; i < 3; ++i) {
        setTimeout(createTimerCallback(i), 1000);
    }
}

function createTimerCallback(i) {
    return function() {
       alert(i);
    };
}

timer();

This being said, this is one of the most asked questions in the javascript tag. See:

share|improve this answer
    
Sooo hacky!! Why does javascript make you do these things? – Neal Nov 11 '13 at 19:27
1  
It's not hacky, it's just how scope works in this language. – bfavaretto Nov 11 '13 at 19:29
1  
There's nothing hacky about it: Function scope versus block scope is a simple language feature which comes with effects like this. It just feels hacky as a lot of other languages have block scope which would prevent this behavior. – Ingo Bürk Nov 11 '13 at 19:29

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