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I'm assigning property values to a class using a ForEach statement. Output will look like this...

Startingpoint | length
-----------------------
0             | 1
1             | 54.47
55.47         | 47.98 

So length is calculated like so...

length = *next item starting point - current item starting point

Here's what I'd like to do in a Pseudo Code esque look.

foreach (DefectMap obj in dm)
{
     mdmList.Add(new ModifiedDefectMap()
        {                        
            StartingPoint = obj.Start,
            Length =  ValueOfNext().obj.Start - obj.Start

The problem is, I have no way of telling what "ValueOfNext().obj.Start" would be, since I am on the current Itereation of the foreach loop.

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2  
1. option - use for loop 2. option - use indexof –  wudzik Nov 11 '13 at 19:25
    
I've fixed the formatting a little. Hope you don't mind –  MarcinJuraszek Nov 11 '13 at 19:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

use a regular for loop

//Count-1 to stop at the second to last item
for(int i = 0; i < dm.Count-1; ++i)
{
      mdmList.Add(new ModifiedDefectMap()
      {                        
           StartingPoint = dm[i].Start,
           Length =  dm[i+1].Start - dm[i].Start
      });
}
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Note: dm must have a indexer for this to work. –  Scott Chamberlain Nov 11 '13 at 19:27
    
this works, but I want it to iterate through the last loop, and then set Length to 0, I'm gonna work on figuring this out –  C Sharper Nov 11 '13 at 19:50

You could try a .Zip() statement.

mdmList = dm.Zip(dm.Skip(1), (current, next) => new ModifiedDefectMap
{
  StartingPoint = current.Start,
  Length = next.Start - current.Start
});

The skip offsets the list, so you end up mapping all pairs of adjacent elements to current and next, and then create the object using them. Seems fairly clean this way.

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I like this zip statement, I've never used it before. Using zip is there an easy way of saying if next == null then Length = 0 –  C Sharper Nov 11 '13 at 19:55
    
Yeah, it's essentially an anonymous function, so you can do whatever you want in there. You could also make the whole (current, next) part a method of the form: private ModifiedDefectMap CreateModifiedMap(DefectMap current, DefectMap next), and then the zip would become mdmList = dm.Zip(dm.Skip(1), CreateModifiedMap); –  Magus Nov 11 '13 at 19:58

If you want to access more then one item at a time you better use for loop.

for(int i = 0; i < dm.Count-1; ++i)
{
      mdmList.Add(new ModifiedDefectMap()
      {                        
           StartingPoint = dm[i].Start,
           Length =  dm[i+1].Start - dm[i].Start
      }
}

If you still want to use foreach loop you can use IndexOf

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I'm not particularly sure if you can look at the next value within a foreach but, if you are doing an implementation like that I would suggest using a for loop to provide the next value, just be sure to check if the would-be next value is within the bounds of the array.

for(int i = 0; i < list.Length; i++)
{
     list[i] = random.Next();
     if(i+1 < list.Length)
     {
         list[i+1] = random.Next();
     }
}

Just be sure to understand that you need list to have an indexer (the [x] array notation) because some collections do not have that, such as HashSet or Stack.

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Several options suggest themselves.

  1. Make the collection (dm) a linked list instead of whatever it is. Then you could write

     while(obj.next != null)
     {
        var length =  obj.Next.Start - obj.Start;
        // whatever else you need to do in iteration
     }
    
  2. Add a property to each object, named Collection containing a reference to the collection dm, and another property named End.

     public double? End // has to be nullable double to return null on last item
     { 
       get 
       { 
           var nDx = Collection.IndexOf(this);
           return Collection.Count > nDx+1?  Collection[nDx + 1].Start: (double?)null;
       }
     }
    
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