Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am wondering if it is possible to set a unique Title tag for a URL with a hash.

For instance, can I have a title for this page:

http://somesite.com

And then have a separate title for this url:

http://somesite.com#something

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by John Conde, random, Bill the Lizard Nov 17 '13 at 16:33

  • This question does not appear to be about programming within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Only with Javascript. – SLaks Nov 11 '13 at 20:01
2  
Normally, the search engines ignore everything after the hashtag because it's usually content contained on the same page or URL. – g3ek1337 Nov 11 '13 at 20:04
    
By definition, a fragment identifier specifies a location or element inside the page, and it is handled by browsers. Search engines read the page title as specified in markup. – Jukka K. Korpela Nov 11 '13 at 21:42
1  
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about SEO – John Conde Nov 12 '13 at 3:20
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This should be helpful:

<html>
    <head>
        <title>Test Title</title>
        <script type="text/javascript">
            var url =document.URL; 
            if(url.indexOf('#')!=-1){
                document.title = "This is the new page title.";
            }
        </script>
    </head>
     <body>
         <a href="?#something">SomeLink</a>
    </body>    
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, exactly what I was looking for. – APAD1 Nov 11 '13 at 20:18
    
@APAD1, the question was tagged with “seo”. Do you expect this to help anything with search engines? It is unrealistic to expect them to execute JavaScript code on pages (though they might do it some day – to detect attempts at fooling them). – Jukka K. Korpela Nov 11 '13 at 21:44

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.