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I've got a problem trying to get python to accept an import 'globally'

In a module it needs to import another module depending on another variable but it doesn't seem to import it into all of the module functions if i have it in the start function; for example:

def start():
    selected = "web"
    exec("from gui import " + selected + " as ui")
    log("going to start gui " + selected)
    ui.start()

this works but in the same module:

def close():
    ui.stop()

doesn't work. i don't know what's going on here

Joe

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3  
There are (much) better ways to dynamically choose a module to import. Check for past questions or ask in a new question if you're interested. As a side effect of improving the approach, you also won't have the issue you're seeing here. –  Peter Hansen Jan 2 '10 at 14:54
    
Sorry, i've picked this way and it works amazing for me. Thanks anyway –  Joe Simpson Jan 2 '10 at 14:59
6  
Seriously. Don't use exec. There is almost never a good reason to. If you must do an import from a dynamic name (and it's a bit of a code smell), look at the __import__ function, eg.: global ui...ui= __import__(selected). –  bobince Jan 2 '10 at 16:07
1  
This is a horrific way of doing imports. At some point down the road, it'll either crash magnificently, or be unmanageable. –  sykora Jan 3 '10 at 13:31
    
okay people.. i'll change it :D –  Joe Simpson Jan 4 '10 at 20:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted
import gui
ui = None

def start():
  selected = "web"
  log("going to start gui " + selected)
  global ui
  __import__("gui.%s" % selected) # if you're importing a submodule that
                                  # may not have been imported yet
  ui = getattr(gui, selected)
  ui.start()
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+1: There's always a simpler, cleaner way. –  S.Lott Jan 2 '10 at 16:42
    
This doesn't work if "selected" is a submodule. For that, do a "__import__('ui.' + selected)" first. –  Andrew Dalke Jan 2 '10 at 20:44

Why do you want to do it this way? Why not use the __import__ builtin? Also, your binding to gui is local to the function start.

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You can provide scope of exec with in. Try this:

exec("from gui import " + selected + " as ui") in globals()
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You are importing the ui module to the start() function scope only. You should import the module to global scope. To do this you could import the module before the two functions (start and close) or provide global scope to exec() function.

Example: To provide global scope to the exec method.

exec("from gui import " + selected + " as ui") in globals()
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thnx. you got the same answer but i had to pick one of them –  Joe Simpson Jan 2 '10 at 14:57
    
You made the right choice. The message written by Imram was sent before. =] –  Pedro Ghilardi Jan 2 '10 at 15:19

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