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I have the following class declaration (I've tried to remove as much excess code as possible):

class List {
    public:
        struct Node {
            int value;
        };
        Node * findNode(unsigned int) {
            return new Node;
        }
};

This gives no error. However, as soon as I define the function "findNode" outside of the class, I get an error; here's the code:

class List {
    public:
        struct Node {
            int value;
        };
        Node * findNode(unsigned int);
};

Node * List::findNode(unsigned int index) {
    return new Node;
}

Now, when running the code, I get an error saying "LinkedList.cpp:9:1: error: 'Node' does not name a type".

I would appreciate any help in determining the problem.

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3  
Also if that's a header file you need to use inline on definitions outside the class. Or you'll get a link error as soon as two source files include the same header. –  Zan Lynx Nov 11 '13 at 23:47

1 Answer 1

Until the compiler encounters List:: it has no idea the Node you're talking about is a member of List. Change the definition to:

List::Node * List::findNode(unsigned int index) {
    return new Node;
}

The "naked" Node inside the function is fine because by that time the compiler knows the function is a member of List.

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@PawełStawarz, no, read the last sentence of the answer: "The "naked" Node inside the function is fine because by that time the compiler knows the function is a member of List." i.e. after List::findNode names are looked up in the scope of List. –  Jonathan Wakely Nov 12 '13 at 0:00

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