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I wrongly named a column hased_password instead of hashed_password.

How can I use a migration to rename this column?

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12 Answers 12

up vote 1051 down vote accepted
rename_column :table, :old_column, :new_column

Update:

You'll probably want to create a separate migration to do this. (Rename FixColumnName as you will)

script/generate migration FixColumnName
# creates  db/migrate/xxxxxxxxxx_fix_column_name.rb

Then edit the migration to do your will.

# db/migrate/xxxxxxxxxx_fix_column_name.rb
class FixColumnName < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def self.up
    rename_column :table_name, :old_column, :new_column
  end

  def self.down
    # rename back if you need or do something else or do nothing
  end
end

An update for Rails 3.1

While, the up and down methods still apply. Rails 3.1 receives a change method that "knows how to migrate your database and reverse it when the migration is rolled back without the need to write a separate down method"

rails g migration FixColumnName

class FixColumnName < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    rename_column :table_name, :old_column, :new_column
  end
end

If you happen to have a whole bunch of columns to rename, or something that would have required repeating the table name over and over again.

rename_column :table_name, :old_column1, :new_column1
rename_column :table_name, :old_column2, :new_column2
...

You could use change_table to keep things a little neater.

class FixColumnNames < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    change_table :table_name do |t|
      t.rename :old_column1, :new_column1
      t.rename :old_column2, :new_column2
      ...
    end
  end
end

Thank you, Luke && Turadg, for bringing up the topic.


Then just db:migrate as usual or however you go about your business.

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4  
self.down should always be the opposite of self.up, so "if you need or do something else or do nothing" isn't really recommended. Just do: rename_column :table_name, :new_column, :old_column –  Luke Griffiths Aug 29 '11 at 15:21
    
While it's normal practice to revert what you did in self.up I would not say self.down "should always be opposite". In depends on the context of your migration. Just putting the "opposite" might not be the "right" down migration. –  kwon Aug 29 '11 at 16:36
9  
In Rails 3.1 you can replace def self.up and def self.down with def change and it'll know how to rollback. –  Turadg Sep 9 '11 at 21:57

imo in this case better use rake db:rollback. Then edit your migration and again type rake db:migrate. However, if you have data in the column you don't want to lose, then use rename_column.

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2  
Even on a "team of one", if you have multiple instances of your app running, say in different environments or on multiple computers etc, managing edited migrations is a major pain. I only edit a migration if I just created it and realized it was wrong, and haven't run it literally anywhere else yet. –  Yetanotherjosh Dec 9 '13 at 1:18

http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActiveRecord/Migration.html

Under Available Transformations

rename_column(table_name, column_name, new_column_name):

Renames a column but keeps the type and content.

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If the column is already populated with data and live in production, I'd recommend a step by step approach, so as to avoid downtime in production while waiting for the migrations.

First I'd create a db migration to add columns with the new name(s) and populate them with the values from the old column name.

class AddCorrectColumnNames < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def up
    add_column :table, :correct_name_column_one, :string
    add_column :table, :correct_name_column_two, :string

    puts 'Updating correctly named columns'
    execute "UPDATE table_name SET correct_name_column_one = old_name_column_one, correct_name_column_two = old_name_column_two"
    end
  end

  def down
    remove_column :table, :correct_name_column_one
    remove_column :table, :correct_name_column_two
  end
end

Then I'd commit just that change, and push the change into production.

git commit -m 'adding columns with correct name'

Then once the commit has been pushed into production, I'd run.

Production $ bundle exec rake db:migrate

Then I'd update all of the views/controllers that referenced the old column name to the new column name. Run through my test suite, and commit just those changes. (After making sure it was working locally and passing all tests first!)

git commit -m 'using correct column name instead of old stinky bad column name'

Then I'd push that commit to production.

At this point you can remove the original column without worrying about any sort of downtime associated with the migration itself.

class RemoveBadColumnNames < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def up
    remove_column :table, :old_name_column_one
    remove_column :table, :old_name_column_two
  end

  def down
    add_column :table, :old_name_column_one, :string
    add_column :table, :old_name_column_two, :string
  end
end

Then push this latest migration to production and run bundle exec rake db:migrate in the background.

I realize this is a bit more involved of a process, but I'd rather do this than have issues with my production migration.

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I like the thinking behind this, and I would +1 your repsonse but that data update would take a very long time to execute since it's going through rails and doing one row at a time. The migration would execute much faster with raw sql statements to update correctly named columns. For example, in the first db migration script, after adding the duplicate column names, execute "Update table_name set correct_name_column_one = old_name_column_one" –  mr.ruh.roh Sep 9 '13 at 18:26
    
@mr.ruh.roh ^ Totally agree, should have written that in the first place. I've edited to reflect a single efficient sql statement. Thanks for the sanity check. –  Paul Pettengill Sep 14 '13 at 2:04

From API: rename_column(table_name, column_name, new_column_name): Renames a column but keeps the type and content.

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If your code is not shared with other one, then best option is to do just rake db:rollback then edit your column name in migration and rake db:migrate. Thats it

And you can write another migration to rename the column

 def change
    rename_column :table_name, :old_name, :new_name
  end

Thats it.

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some version of rails support to up/down method to migration and

if you have up/down method in your migration, then :

def up
    rename_column :table_name, :column_old_name, :column_new_name
end

def down
    rename_column :table_name, :column_new_name, :column_old_name
end

if you have change method in you migration, then:

def change
    rename_column :table_name, :column_old_name, :column_new_name
end

for more information you can move : http://www.tutorialspoint.com/ruby-on-rails/rails-migrations.htm or http://apidock.com/rails/ActiveRecord/Migration

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As an alternative option, if you are not married to the idea of migrations, there is a compelling gem for ActiveRecord which will handle the name changes automatically for you, Datamapper style. All you do is change the column name in your model (and make sure you put Model.auto_upgrade! at the bottom of your model.rb) and viola! Database is updated on the fly.

https://github.com/DAddYE/mini_record

Note: You will need to nuke db/schema.rb to prevent conflicts

Still in beta phases and obviously not for everyone but still a compelling choice (I am currently using it in two non-trivial production apps with no issues)

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Ha! I can totally hear that. Thanks for the correction –  Steven Garcia Jan 9 at 16:47

If you need to switch column names you will need to create a placeholder to avoid a duplicate column name error. Here's an example:

class SwitchIp < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    rename_column :styles, :x, :holder
    rename_column :styles, :y, :x
    rename_column :styles, :holder, :y
  end
end
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Simply create new migration, and in block use rename_column , like this

rename_column :your_table_name, :hashed_password, :hased_password
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if the present data is not important for you you can just take down your original migration using

rake db:migrate:down VERSION='YOUR MIGRATION FILE VERSION HERE'

without the quotes, then make changes in the original migration and run the up migration again by

rake db:migrate
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Manually we can use below method:

We can edit migration manually like

Open app/db/migrate/xxxxxxxxx_migration_file.rb

Update hased_password to hashed_password

Run the below command

$> rake db:migrate:down VERSION=xxxxxxxxx

then it will remove your migration

$> rake db:migrate:up VERSION=xxxxxxxxx

It will add your migration with updated change.

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