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Let's say I'm releasing a new version of my software every month (I'm increasing minor only). Due to some complicated architecture, multiple solutions, etc all the referenced assemblies are added with specific version set to true, so every month I need to manually update the .csproj files and change the version number of the referenced assemblies.

Is this the proper way to solve such an issue? Are there tools to accomplish this?

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Why is Specific version set to true? Can't you change this to false? – Markus Nov 12 '13 at 9:26
    
No! I need them on true! – rufusz Nov 12 '13 at 9:54
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I don't know of a tool that does this job already; however, csproj-files are just XML files, so you can create one yourself easily. If you do this on a monthly basis, I think the effort would pay off fast.
As you might know from your manual approach, you'd have to look for elements that look similar like this (namespace "http://schemas.microsoft.com/developer/msbuild/2003"):

<Reference Include="AssemblyName, Version=3.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, processorArchitecture=MSIL">
  <HintPath>...</HintPath>
</Reference>

For a detailed overview over the project file format see this link. In addition, you might need to check out the files from source control. If you are using TFS, tf.exe can be used to automate this.

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Thx, this is the approach I already started to implement, but I was curious how others tackle this problem and/or how do they solve this in production environment(s). – rufusz Nov 12 '13 at 11:25

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