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My matrix is a 8x8 having binary values. I want to filter out patterns of consecutive three 1's i.e.(111) in the diagonals of upper triangular matrix of M. I have written a piece of python code with for and while loop but it did not work and I am unable to figure out whats happening there. Please help..

rf =([1,0,1,0,1,0,0,0],
     [1,0,1,0,1,0,0,0],
     [1,0,1,0,1,0,0,0],
     [1,0,1,0,1,0,0,0],
     [1,0,1,0,1,0,0,0],
     [1,0,1,0,1,0,0,0],
     [1,0,1,0,1,0,0,0],
     [1,0,1,0,1,0,0,0])

for i in range(1):
    for j in range(len (rf)-3):
        while (i<len(rf)-3 and j<len(rf)-3):
             count =0
             if rf[i,j]==True:     
               for w in range(3):
                   if rf[i+w,j+w]==True:
                      count +=1
                      print count
               if count==3:
                  i=i+3
                  j=j+3
               else:
                    rf[i,j]=False
                    i=i+1
                    j=j+1
share|improve this question
    
What's the point of for i in range(1)? You may just as well drop the loop and assign i = 0. –  Frerich Raabe Nov 12 '13 at 9:19
    
What do you mean by "filter out" here? Do you want to reset those three 1s to 0s or do you want to know where they occur? –  Johannes Charra Nov 12 '13 at 9:21
1  
Two things - you don't have a 8x8 matrix unless there is an error in copy paste; and be careful with numbers that start with 0, as this is the octal notation in Python 2. –  Burhan Khalid Nov 12 '13 at 9:21
    
I want to retain three consecutive 1's if number of 1's are >=3 otherwise make them 0. And the window length (3 in this case) is a variable in general. –  user2964728 Nov 12 '13 at 9:23
1  
In the sample matrix, there's not a single occurrance of three consecutive ones in a diagonal, right? –  Frerich Raabe Nov 12 '13 at 9:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You might simplify your code using numpy to access diagonals:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> rf = [[1,0,1,0,1,0,0,0]] * 8
>>> m = np.array(rf)
>>> m.diagonal(0)
array([1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0])
>>> m.diagonal(1)
array([0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0])

a simply routine to find positions of consecutive ones:

def consecutive_values(arr, val=1, cnt=3):
    def comparator(pos):
        return arr[pos] == val
    if len < cnt:
        return []
    else:
        return [p for p, x in  enumerate(arr[:1-cnt]) 
                     if all(map(comparator, xrange(p, p+cnt, 1)))]

and usage:

>>> consecutive_values([1]*5)
[0, 1, 2]

>>> consecutive_values([1]*5 + [0]*4 + [1]*3)
[0, 1, 2, 9]

>>> m = np.array([[1]*8]*8)
>>> diagonals = map(m.diagonal, range(len(m)))
>>> map(consecutive_values, diagonals)
[[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5], [0, 1, 2, 3, 4], [0, 1, 2, 3], [0, 1, 2], [0, 1], [0], [], []]
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I have tried the diagonal idea but I gave up after struggling for a day. –  user2964728 Nov 12 '13 at 9:30
    
Dear Frerich, yes, that is true and that's what I want that if there is no 111 then fill the canvas with zeroes –  user2964728 Nov 12 '13 at 9:33
    
@user2964728 what is canvas? and see update for simple consecutive values extractor –  alko Nov 12 '13 at 9:39
    
canvas means the area in the upper triangular region when I plot this matrix in 2-D dotplot –  user2964728 Nov 12 '13 at 9:42
    
Thank you very much alko :) –  user2964728 Nov 12 '13 at 9:56

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