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I have some doubts about equals and hashCode contract in Java using EqualsVerifier library.

Imagine we have something like this

public abstract class Person {

    protected String name;

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        // only name is taken into account
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        // only name is taken into account
    }

}

And the following extended class:

public final class Worker extends Person {

    private String workDescription;

    @Override
    public final boolean equals(Object obj) {
        // name and workDescription are taken into account
    }

    @Override
    public final int hashCode() {
        // name and workDescription are taken into account
    }

}

I try to test whether I fulfill the equals and hashCode contract in the Person class, using EqualsVerifier

    @Test
    public void testEqualsAndHashCodeContract() {
        EqualsVerifier.forClass(Person.class).verify();
    }

Running this test, I get that I have to declare equals and hashCode methods final, but this is something that I don't want to do, because I may want to declare these two methods in the extended classes, since I want to use some child's attributes in equals and hashCode.

Could you skip for testing the final rule in the EqualsVerifier library? Or am I missing something?

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1 Answer 1

Getting that right is very tricky.

The documentation of EqualsVerifier explains a workaround:

EqualsVerifier.forClass(MyClass.class)
    .withRedefinedSubclass(SomeSubclass.class)
    .verify();

Note that for this to work, you probably need to check getClass() in your equals because a Worker can (or should) never be equal to a Person.

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