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Here is the standard pig latin code used in codeacademy. It works well but it's shortcoming is that it only works for one word at a time:

pyg = 'ay'

original = raw_input('Enter a word or phrase:')

if len(original) > 0 and original.isalpha():
    word = original.lower()
    translate = word[1:] + word[0]
    if word[0] != "a" and word[0] != "e" and word[0] != "i" and word[0] != "o" and word[0] != "u":
        new_word = translate + pyg
        print new_word
    else:
        new_word = word + pyg
        print new_word
else:
    print 'Input is empty or illegal'

so I wanted to make it so that it could phrases. This is what I came up with:

pyg = 'ay'

count = 0

original_input = raw_input('Enter a word or phrase:')

original = original_input

original_list = []

#converts to a list
while " " in original:
    if count > 50:
        break
    word = original[0:original.index(" ")]
    original_list.append(word)
    space = original.index(" ")
    space += 1
    original = original[space:]
    count += 1
#this works great until there is a word left and no spaces i.e. the last word
if len(original) > 0:
    original_list.append(original)
#this adds the last word

print original_list

def pyglatin(phrase):
#old code doesn't work because phrase is a list
        #now I have to translate BACK to a string
        for words in phrase:
            new_word = str(words)
    """this works for one word, how do I assign a new variable for every word if I don't know the phrase length ahead of time"""

so that brings me to my question: How do I assign a variable for every item when I don't know how many items I'm going to need, and then be able to call that code back (through the old pyglatin translator)?

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2  
I don't understand, you want a variable for each word but you don't know how many words you have. That's the purpose of a list! –  Maxime Nov 12 '13 at 13:00
    
Hopefully editing to include the code added some clarity –  Gingynator Nov 12 '13 at 13:13
    
I don't think it did. Your question seems misguided as you don't actually need to have a separate variable for each item, you just access them in a loop. By the way, to split a sentence into words you can use words = sentence.split() instead of that loop you wrote. –  interjay Nov 12 '13 at 13:20
    
Try splitting the phrase into a list of words using original_list = original.split() –  Simon Hibbs Nov 12 '13 at 13:22

2 Answers 2

As Maxime mentioned, lists are useful in this instance, and the string can be converted to a list much easier. To account for phrases, I would rewrite the code as follows:

def trans_word(original):
    if len(original) > 0 and original.isalpha():
        word = original.lower()
        translate = word[1:] + word[0]
        if word[0] != "a" and word[0] != "e" and word[0] != "i" and word[0] != "o" and word[0] != "u":
            new_word = translate + pyg
            return new_word
        else:
            new_word = word + pyg
            return new_word
    else:
        return "Input is empty or illegal"


def pyglatin(phrase):
    if len(phrase) > 0:
        return " ".join(trans_word(word) for word in phrase)
    else:
        return "Input is empty or illegal"


pyg = 'ay'
count = 0
original_input = raw_input('Enter a word or phrase:')
original_list = original_input.split()

print pyglatin(original_list)
share|improve this answer

Maybe something like this?

def latinize(word):
        word = word.lower()
        translate = word[1:] + word[0]
        return (translate if word[0] in 'aeiou' else word) + 'ay'

original = raw_input('Enter a word or phrase:')
print ' '.join(latinize(word) for word in original.split())

Example input and output:

Enter a word or phrase:Gallia est omnis divisa in partes tres
galliaay steay mnisoay divisaay niay partesay tresay

But shouldn't you actually move all initial consonants to the end, and not only the first?

Edit:

If you want to move all initial consonants to the end, you can use:

def latinize(word):
        word = word.lower()
        firstvowel = min (word.index (v) if v in word else 42042 for v in 'aeiou')
        if firstvowel == 42042: raise Exception ('No vowel in word')
        return word [firstvowel:] + word [:firstvowel] + 'ay'

original = raw_input('Enter a word or phrase:')
print ' '.join(latinize (word) for word in original.split () )

Sample input and output:

Enter a word or phrase:star chick mess string
arstay ickchay essmay ingstray
share|improve this answer
    
You guys tore apart my code and made it so much simpler: I love it! –  Gingynator Nov 12 '13 at 13:35
    
@Gingynator Please see my edit. –  Hyperboreus Nov 12 '13 at 13:42

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