Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

My environment: Xcode5, iOS, Objective-C/Objective-C++ mix.

I am trying to figure out what causes the next problem. I am writing my own logging function:

int _me_log(const char *fmt, ...) {

va_list args;
va_start(args, fmt);

char *c = va_arg(args, char *);

char *message = NULL;

printf(fmt, args);

int n = asprintf(&message, fmt, args);

if (n != -1 && message != NULL) {
 //do something with 'message' like writing to file, etc.
 UPDATE:
//we need to handle memory created for 'message' storage.
free(message); 
}
va_end(args);

return n;

}

Then I call it like this:

_me_log("socket %s did open", "Socket: 0x1fd1c880");

And instead of correct output socket Socket: 0x1fd1c880 did open I get some gibberish like this socket \\323\331/ did open in this line printf(fmt, args);.

If I call it this way printf("%s", c); I get correct results.

I have googled several implementations (this or this ) of logging functions and functions which pass variable parameters and it seems that I do everything correctly.

Could you please suggest me what I'm doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
It looks like you want vasprintf instead of asprintf. –  Neal Nov 12 '13 at 14:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You've got the right idea to use va_list here, but if you work with va_list you should use vasprintf instead of asprintf:

int _me_log(const char *fmt, ...)
{
    va_list args;
    char *message = NULL;
    int n;

    va_start(args, fmt);
    n = vasprintf(&message, fmt, args);

    if (n != -1 && message != NULL) {
        // ... use message ...
    }
    free(message);
    va_end(args);

    return n;
}

For every routine of the printf family, there is a variant that takes a va_list instead of the variadic argument ... and whose name is prefixed with the letter v, for example:

int printf(const char *format, ...);
int vprintf(const char *format, va_list ap);

These routines exist so you can write you own (non-macro) wrapper for xprintf.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I have already added a comment to previous answer. I am accepting you answer because it provides direct answer to my question and code in it. trojanfoe's answer is also correct. –  user1264176 Nov 12 '13 at 14:07
    
You accept the memory leaks as well? –  trojanfoe Nov 12 '13 at 14:10
    
@trojanfoe if you mean leaking 'message' then of course I handle that. I omitted it for code brevity. –  user1264176 Nov 12 '13 at 14:12
    
Updated question with freeing of 'message' memory. Just in case someone copy/pastes it. –  user1264176 Nov 12 '13 at 14:17
    
OK that makes more sense, however the call to free() which is now in this answer is in the wrong place. –  trojanfoe Nov 12 '13 at 14:20

Seems like a very complicated implementation. Try:

int _me_log(const char *fmt, ...) {
    int ret = 0;
    va_list va;
    va_start(va, fmt);
    ret = vprintf(fmt, va);
    va_end(va);

    putc('\n', stdout);
    return ret;
}

But, of course, that is no different from printf(), except for forcing a newline.

share|improve this answer
    
Now I see my mistake. You can't call printf with va_list as a parameter like this "printf(fmt, va);". You have to call vprintf() instead. Thanks. –  user1264176 Nov 12 '13 at 14:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.