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I've got a test setup method where I create a tempfile.NamedTemporaryFile. The code I then want to test needs to read the content of that file. When it does that it looks like the file is empty.

import tempfile

fp1 = tempfile.NamedTemporaryFile()
fp1.write('foo')
fp2 = open(fp1.name)
print fp2.read()  # I expect "foo" here
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

The reason this happens is that the write method is "buffered", in other words not all write() calls to the filesystem immediately result in a change on disk. There are a number of ways to solve this:

flush() after write()

import tempfile

fp1 = tempfile.NamedTemporaryFile()
fp1.write('foo')
fp2 = open(fp1.name)
# Because of buffering we've not yet written to the file.
assert fp2.read() == ''
fp1.flush()
# We've now explicitly written to the file.
assert fp2.read() == 'foo'
fp1.close()
fp2.close()

Or you can set buffering to 0 which is an ugly way of saying "don't buffer but write to disk immediately".

# Let's do it again, but now use buffering.
fp1 = tempfile.NamedTemporaryFile(bufsize=0)
fp1.write('foo')
fp2 = open(fp1.name)
# Because we've set buffering to 0 (so no buffering) we've written to the
# file.
assert fp2.read() == 'foo'
fp1.close()
fp2.close()
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