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I will be short and very clear. I want to do what's on the figure below using constraints. Any suggestions or solutions? enter image description hereenter image description here

Description:
The coloured places are UIViews, containing for ex. 4 labels. So what constraint should I use to manipulate with the second UIView so in Portrait mode to be under the first one and in Landscape to be next to it?

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By changing contraints when the app is rotating ? – malinois Nov 12 '13 at 16:21
    
Yes, I know that I should add constraint programatically on rotating, but in landscape I should link somehow the second UIView to be right of the first. In portrait to be under it. – Slavco Petkovski Nov 12 '13 at 16:26
    
With a position contraint to the orange view – malinois Nov 12 '13 at 16:30
    
You are not helping man… I need specific guide of how to do this. My guesses are that in updateViewConstraints I should check for the current orientation and there link the both views with the desired constraints, but I'm not sure of HOW to do this. – Slavco Petkovski Nov 12 '13 at 16:34
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The code below assumes you already have a reference to the orange view and the yellow view in your code. When in portrait mode you want them to be in sequence so you can have a layout as such

NSLayoutConstraint *portraitConstraint = [NSLayoutConstraint
                                          constraintWithItem:orangeView
                                          attribute:NSLayoutAttributeBottom
                                          relatedBy:NSLayoutRelationEqual
                                          toItem:yellowView
                                          attribute:NSLayoutAttributeTop
                                          multiplier:1.0f
                                          constant:2.0f];
[self.view addConstraint:portraitConstraint];

When in landscape mode you can have a layout constraint as such

NSLayoutConstraint *landscapeConstraint = [NSLayoutConstraint
                                           constraintWithItem:orangeView
                                           attribute:NSLayoutAttributeTrailing
                                           relatedBy:NSLayoutRelationEqual
                                           toItem:yellowView
                                           attribute:NSLayoutAttributeLeading
                                           multiplier:1.0f
                                           constant:2.0f];
[self.view addConstraint:landscapeConstraint];

Now these are not the full list of constraints you would need, if you build in the code and only the code you would have to have the orange view stick to the top, leading and trailing of the view and then in the code have the yellow view stick to the leading, trailing and bottom in the view for portrait.

In landscape you would have the orange view stick to the top, bottom and leading while the yellow view would stick to the top, bottom and trailing.

The constraints that are above would allow so you do not need a height to be set, but you might want to also say something like the orange view bottom is centerY - 1.0 in portrait and centerX - 1.0f in landscape thus avoiding the need for widths and heights and hence not worrying about the size of the screen. Center X and Y are below

NSLayoutConstraint *centerX = [NSLayoutConstraint
                               constraintWithItem:orangeView
                               attribute:NSLayoutAttributeCenterX
                               relatedBy:NSLayoutRelationEqual
                               toItem:self.view
                               attribute:NSLayoutAttributeCenterX
                               multiplier:1.0f
                               constant:-1.0f];
[self.view addConstraint:centerX];

NSLayoutConstraint *centerY = [NSLayoutConstraint
                               constraintWithItem:orangeView
                               attribute:NSLayoutAttributeCenterY
                               relatedBy:NSLayoutRelationEqual
                               toItem:self.view
                               attribute:NSLayoutAttributeCenterY
                               multiplier:1.0f
                               constant:-1.0f];
[self.view addConstraint:centerY];

The above constraints should help you on your way to resolving the issue.

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Ok, i will try this and inform you soon. – Slavco Petkovski Nov 12 '13 at 17:03
    
Well the constraints for portrait were ok, because I've designed my view there is only 2 of them were required. But in landscape i had to add several constraints. I mean the idea is nice and i will accept this answer. Thank you. – Slavco Petkovski Nov 13 '13 at 14:42
    
Thanks, i did not provide all landscape i said it would help you on your way, yep there would be some more needed for landscape but glad you got it working correctly – darren102 Nov 13 '13 at 14:48

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