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I am writing some interfaces but the way I have done it now seems to defeat the purpose of interfaces. The reason is that I need to first instantiate an instance of the implementation before I can use the interface, like so:

Interface interfaceName = new InterfaceImplementation(someRequiredValueForConstructor);

This doesn't make sense to me since I believe the point of an interface is that the user should not have to ever call the implementation, but it is necessary to do so with the way I have set them up right now. The interface is declared as an interface, and the implementation is declared as a class which implements the interface. How should I design my interfaces so that the use never has to directly use the implementation?

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1  
This doesn't make sense to me since I believe the point of an interface is that the user should not have to ever call the implementation Don't worry, this is handled by dependency injection and Inversion of Control frameworks like Spring, Guice and CDI. –  Luiggi Mendoza Nov 12 '13 at 16:53
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You could use the factory pattern. Try googling java factory pattern. Or you could do as Luiggi suggested, but it is a bit more complicated if you are just starting out with Java. –  rmlan Nov 12 '13 at 16:53
    
Well .... at some time someone actually has to create an instance, and hence there must be a class. –  Ingo Nov 12 '13 at 16:54
    
@rmlan these frameworks already implement an abstract factory. –  Luiggi Mendoza Nov 12 '13 at 16:54

4 Answers 4

An interface allows you to develop a contract that a class must follow. For instance, if you have a Radio class, you might define an interface with the following methods:

public void Send(String msg); - Transmits a string over RF.

public String Listen(); - Listens for a string over RF.

Now, when you go to actually create a specific type of Radio, you must implement the above methods:

public class MyRadio implements Radio
{
    @Override
    public void Send(String msg)
    {
        // Implementation specific details for MyRadio
    }

    @Override
    public String Listen()
    {
        // Implementation specific details for MyRadio
    }
}

You could then do the following:

Radio radio = new MyRadio();
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I think you are mixing two concepts and hence confused.

  1. We need to use interface methods only in the consumer classes, which makes the usage implementation independent.

  2. You can externalize the instantiation part of the interface implementation classes to common places to make usage more cleaner e.g. factory pattern. This is the core of "Spring Dependency Injection".

Be mindful, that interfaces just behave like markers and they won't work without the concrete implementation.

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The point of an interface is to specify a contract that is followed by all implementations. You have to use some sort of specific implementation when instantiating otherwise which implementation would you choose?

The advantage in typing something with the interface is that you can easily swap out implementations if need be (for example swapping out an ArrayList<T> with a LinkedList<T>; if you have typed your variable using List<T>, this change should be seamless). Using interfaces also makes your code much less tightly-coupled to a particular implementation.

Furthermore, when you use something like dependency injection or inversion of control, you can type the dependency using the interface. If you are using a framework that supports (like Spring), it might be smart enough to find the implementation for you. You can also tell the framework to use a particular implementation of the interface. But the point is that your code is not expecting any particular implementation which means that you can switch them out in future, if need be.

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What if I wouldn't ever need the option to switch between implementations? My code is designed so that each interface has one and only one implementation for it. –  Eric St-Onge Nov 12 '13 at 17:01
    
@EricSt-Onge Some people would invoke YAGNI and say that you don't need an interface in that case. But I would still argue that you do, because you may be sure today that you won't need other implementations, but you never know. If and when that time comes, your code will be far more easier to refactor if you had typed everything using interfaces instead of concrete implementations. –  Vivin Paliath Nov 12 '13 at 17:04

There are patterns such as Abstract Factory and others that would pass the creation of the implementation somewhere where the user doesn't have to worry about it, but the main idea of interfaces is not to have "the user never call the implementation". After all you're using the List interface through ArrayLists all the time.

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