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I've noticed my console window will not display numbers over 500 when outputing [x] amount of numbers over 498. i've tried different variation of the for loop. I know I can convert this to a function, class, or implement a struct, but I've tried this using , and even foreach and it will still skip over numbers. So I've become curious about this and decided to finally post a question.

The code is basic:

        for (int i = 3; i < 1001 ; i+=3)
        {

            if (i > 0 && i < 200)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(i);

            }

            if (i > 200 && i < 400)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(i);
            }

            if (i > 400 && i < 600)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(i);
            }
            if (i > 600 && i < 800)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(i);
            }
            if (i > 800 && i < 1000)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(i);
            }

        }

        Console.ReadKey();
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1  
What do you mean by 'skip over numbers'? What output do you expect? –  S_F Nov 12 '13 at 17:26
    
Basically I want to output the multiples of 3 up to 1000. A basic Project Euler question. But I noticed the console window starts at 200+ if I simply code: for(int i = 3; i<1001;i+=3). If I code: for(int i = 3; i<500;i+=3). It outputs normally. –  Brendaneus Phaos Nov 12 '13 at 17:29
2  
Console window has a limit on lines displayed. The first ones are just getting lost but they were printed. It was done too fast for you to notice though. By the way, this program will not print 600 because it doesn't fit in either i<600 or i>600. –  S_F Nov 12 '13 at 17:33
1  
Are the numbers that are skipped 200, 400, 600, and 800? –  mikeTheLiar Nov 12 '13 at 17:33
1  
Have you tried to debug the code and see if the lines are being hit? Like @S_F says, chances are that it is adding lines too quickly for you to see –  David Pilkington Nov 12 '13 at 17:34
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4 Answers

The console has a maximum number of lines that can be displayed. This is it's "buffer" size. If you write a new line when the buffer is full then the "oldest" line is removed.

You can see what the buffer size is using:

Console.BufferHeight

The buffer's size will depend on the specific shell program being used, and the settings that it's set to.

You can use:

Console.SetBufferSize

to set the buffer size, but even that can only set it to be so large.

If you need to view output too large to effectively see through the console consider writing the data to a file instead of (or in addition to) writing it out to the console.

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Thank you very much for this response. –  Brendaneus Phaos Nov 13 '13 at 14:24
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Sounds like you want this...

        for (int i = 3; i < 1001; i ++)
        {

            if (i % 3 == 0)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(i);
            }
        }

        Console.ReadKey();

The '%' operator is modulus... it returns the remainder after dividing by 3.

share|improve this answer
    
Looks like that's intention, OP mentions that in a comment. –  mikeTheLiar Nov 12 '13 at 17:32
    
I want it to only display the multiples of 3 up to 1000 but the Console.WriteLine() method stops at around 500. For example, this code stop at 498 in the console window. (int i = 3; i <1001 ; i+=3) { if (i < 1000) { Console.WriteLine(i); } } –  Brendaneus Phaos Nov 12 '13 at 17:37
    
Edited the code now that OP has stated his intent. –  dazedandconfused Nov 12 '13 at 17:40
    
@John H , Thanks, I understand this implementation because it is most often used with Fizzbuzz. But I've noticed even this starts at 102 and ends at 999. –  Brendaneus Phaos Nov 12 '13 at 17:43
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To simpler your code and fit result set on Console windows, please try this:

for(int i=3; i<1000; i+=3)
{
   Console.Write(i + ", ");
}
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Your question is how many lines can the console output before previous lines begin to disappear. The console will only hold a certain amount of lines. We can determine how many lines the console can hold like so:

for(int i = 0; i < 500; i++)
{
    Console.WriteLine(i);
}

This produces the output: 201 202 ... 498 499

We can conclude that the console can hold 499 - 201 lines = 298 + 1 = 299 lines.

So, after 299 lines have been written, the oldest line will be removed, and the newest added. If you want to physically see every line, you could put Console.ReadLine() after every 299 lines that are printed.

for(int i = 0; i < 500; i++)
{
    Console.WriteLine(i);
    if(299 % i == 0)
    {
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

Or, simply use Console.Write(i+ " "), avoiding the use of new lines.

P.S.

You are seeing 102 105 .. 996 999

999 - 102 = 897

897/3 = 299

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That's a pretty inefficient means of determining the buffer's size. Also note that it's not constant; it can be set to different values, or even change during the execution of your program. –  Servy Nov 12 '13 at 18:04
    
I agree, but this is OP asking for an explanation to a specific issue, and this provides that explanation. –  Colton Nov 12 '13 at 18:08
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