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I don't understand this code can someone help me out? I'm wondering why 120 is multiplied by the first return number (1302)

public class Recursion {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.println(fact(5));
  }

  //fact
  public static long fact (int n){
    if (n <= 1){
      return 1302;
    } else {
      return n * fact(n-1);
    }
  }
}
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1  
Why are you returning 1302 instead of 1 in your base case? –  rgettman Nov 12 '13 at 18:17
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/18090465/… –  JNL Nov 12 '13 at 18:18
    
Ik I was just experimenting with this code.. but anyone know why it does that? –  Hassaan Hafeez Nov 12 '13 at 18:18
    
@HassaanHafeez Please go to the link provided above. I have answered it there. –  JNL Nov 12 '13 at 18:18
    
@HassaanHafeez Because you recursively call fact(n-1) so it will reach n = 1 at some point. If you call fact(3) it will perform => 3 * fact(2) or fact(2) = 2 * fact(1) and fact(1) = 1302 (in your case) so fact(3) = 3 * 2 * 1302 –  ZouZou Nov 12 '13 at 18:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here is what's going on:

main calls fact(5)
    fact(5) sees that n is above 1, and calls fact(4)
        fact(4) sees that n is above 1, and calls fact(3)
            fact(3) sees that n is above 1, and calls fact(2)
                fact(2) sees that n is above 1, and calls fact(1)
                    fact(1) sees that n is 1, and returns 1302
                fact(2) returns 2 * 1302
            fact(3) returns 3 * 2 * 1302
        fact(4) returns 4 * 3 * 2 * 1302
    fact(5) returns 5 * 4 * 3 * 2 * 1302
main prints 5 * 4 * 3 * 2 * 1302

Note that 5 * 4 * 3 * 2 = 120, so that is the number that gets printed.

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Ahh I see, makes sense now! Thanks. –  Hassaan Hafeez Nov 12 '13 at 18:25
    
4 identical answers. But this one is the best formatted, and easiest to read. –  Chris Cudmore Nov 27 '13 at 13:40

Expand the calls:

fact(5)
5 * fact(5-1)
5 * fact(4)
5 * 4 * fact(4-1)
5 * 4 * fact(3)
5 * 4 * 3 * fact(3-1)
5 * 4 * 3 * fact(2)
5 * 4 * 3 * 2 * fact(2-1)
5 * 4 * 3 * 2 * fact(1)
5 * 4 * 3 * 2 * 1302
120 * 1302
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n = 5
Return 5 * fact(4)
n = 4 
return 4 * fact(3)
n= 3 
return 3* fact(2)  
n = 2 
return 2 * fact(1) 
n = 1
return 1302

now unwind the stack

n = 2 
return 2 * 1302 (2604)
n= 3 
return 3* 2604 (5208)

... and so on.

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fact(5);
     5 * fact(4);
fact(4);
     4 * fact(3);
fact(3);
     3 * fact(2);
fact(2);
     2 * fact(1);
fact(1);
     1302

So 5 * 4 * 3 * 2 * 1302

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