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Suppose I have the following jQuery code:

var FooBar = {
    zizzle: function (callback) {
        var x, y, z;
        // … do stuff with x y and z
        callback(z, y, z);
    }
}

$("a[href]").each(function () {
    var link = this;

    // do things with the link, e.g. 
    $(link).data('fiddle', "deedee")

    function do_something() {
        console.log("I would use the link variable here:", link)
        // lots of code here using link
        // blah, blah, blah link
    }

    $(this).click(function () {
        FooBar.zizzle(do_something);
    });
});

Currently, because do_something is inside of the function where link is defined it has access to that variable (closure). However, I'm wondering whether it's possible to avoid creating the function for every link. I'd rather do something closer to this:

var FooBar = {
    zizzle: function (callback) {
        var x, y, z;
        // … do stuff with x y and z
        callback(z, y, z);
    }
}

function do_something() {
    console.log("I would use the link variable here:", link)
    // lots of code here using link
    // blah, blah, blah link
}

$("a[href]").each(function () {
    var link = this;

    // do things with the link, e.g. 
    $(link).data('fiddle', "deedee")

    $(this).click(function () {
        FooBar.zizzle(do_something);
    });
});

So that do_something is only created once. However, if I do this, then do_something no longer has a value for link.

Assume in this case that it's not possible to change the code for FooBar and that it expects just a callback and can't send along any additional parameters.

The only alternative I've thought of is something like this, which at least only creates functions as needed:

var FooBar = {
    zizzle: function (callback) {
        var x, y, z;
        // … do stuff with x y and z
        callback(z, y, z);
    }
}

function do_something_maker(link) {
    return function (x, y, z) {
        console.log("I would use the link variable here:", link)
        // lots of code here using link
        // blah, blah, blah link
    }
}

$("a[href]").each(function () {
    var link = this;

    // do things with the link, e.g. 
    $(link).data('fiddle', "deedee")

    $(this).click(function () {
        FooBar.zizzle(do_something_maker(link));
    });
});

Is that the best option?

share|improve this question
1  
I think that's a fine approach, but aren't you still creating a new function per click? By the way, such questions would be a better fit in codereview.stackexchange.com. –  Vivin Paliath Nov 12 '13 at 21:02
    
But your last option creates a new function each time the click event is triggered, doesn't it? –  Nadir Sampaoli Nov 12 '13 at 21:03
1  
$.proxy(), look into it. –  epascarello Nov 12 '13 at 21:05
    
$("body").on("click", "a[href]", function(e){ do_something_maker.call(this, this); }); –  dandavis Nov 12 '13 at 21:05
    
You don't seem to ever var link; –  Paul S. Nov 12 '13 at 21:09

5 Answers 5

Here you go:

var FooBar = {
    zizzle: function (callback) {
        var x, y, z;
        // … do stuff with x y and z
        callback(z, y, z);
    }
}

function do_something() {
    console.log("I would use the link variable here:", do_something.link);
    //if no link exists, abort
    if(!do_something.link){return;}
    //code with do_something.link


    //you might want to delete afterwards
    //delete do_something.link;
}

$("a[href]").click(function () {
    do_something.link = this;
    FooBar.zizzle(do_something);
});

In case you have something async and slow ongoing, you can try to make it lazy like do_something_maker or the bind/$.proxy approach, but only once for each link (on the first click and add it to $.data).

var FooBar = {
    zizzle: function (callback) {
        var x, y, z;
        // … do stuff with x y and z
        callback(z, y, z);
    }
}

function do_something() {
    console.log("I would use the link variable here:", this);

}

$("a[href]").click(function () {
    var fn = $.data(this, 'zizzleCB') || $.data(this, 'zizzleCB', do_something.bind(this));
    FooBar.zizzle(fn);
});
share|improve this answer
    
The only problem with this is if the callbacks are called more than once and not used in the same order of the event. That last assignment of do_something.link will always be used. –  Smeegs Nov 12 '13 at 21:20
    
That would work, but could cause problems if there's something async happening. –  Blue Skies Nov 12 '13 at 21:21
    
@Smeegs only if async behaviour is there. –  alexander farkas Nov 12 '13 at 21:24
    
@alexanderfarkas That's the scenario I was describing. –  Smeegs Nov 12 '13 at 21:30
    
bind is the same as create_do_something, you'll create a function for each anchor. –  HMR Nov 13 '13 at 4:59

Why not just passing "link" as an argument to your zizzle function and pass it to the callback ?

sth like :

var FooBar = {
    zizzle: function (callback,link) {
        var x, y, z;
        // … do stuff with x y and z
        callback(x, y, z, link);
    }
}

function do_something(x, y, z, link) {
    console.log("I would use the link variable here:", link)
    // lots of code here using link
    // blah, blah, blah link
}

$("a[href]").on("click", function () {
    FooBar.zizzle(do_something, this);
});
share|improve this answer
    
The question states that the code for Foobar can't be changed. –  Blue Skies Nov 12 '13 at 21:09
    
ah sorry i overread that –  john Smith Nov 12 '13 at 21:10

Just for the kicks:

var Util = function() {};
Util.prototype.do_something = function() {};

var FooBar = function() {
};
FooBar.prototype.zizzle = function(fn) {};

var fooBar = new FooBar();
var util = new Util();
fooBar.zizzle(util.do_something);

What has this given you?

Well for each FooBar object you create you will have 1 less instance of zizzle (since all functions are objects you effectively have 1 less). For each instance of Util, you will have 1 less instance of do_something AND you can now decide better when you want a Util instance and not clutter the global object with an unused function.

This works because we're defining one function on the prototype instead of letting the functions run rampant in a object literal {} or attach them to the global namespace

share|improve this answer

You can use Function.prototype.bind:

var FooBar = {
    zizzle: function (callback) {
        var x, y, z;
        // … do stuff with x y and z
        callback(z, y, z);
    }
}

function do_something() {
    console.log("'this' refers to link here", this)
    // lots of code here using link
    // blah, blah, blah link
}

$("a[href]").each(function () {
    link = this;
    $(this).click(function () {
        FooBar.zizzle(do_something.bind(link));
    });
});
share|improve this answer
    
which is mostly the same as do_something_maker. –  alexander farkas Nov 12 '13 at 21:28
    
I understand that .bind creates a new function; does anyone know if it does it more efficiently than how do_something_maker works? –  Jordan Reiter Nov 13 '13 at 17:15
    

You should register click on the container of the elements you're interested in. In your case that would be document.body. Then have an extra selector figure out when to take action: http://api.jquery.com/on/ Here is an example

function create_do_something($link){
  return function(z,y,x){
    do_something(z,y,x);
  };
}
$(document.body).on("click","a[href]",function () {
  var $link =  this;
  FooBar.zizzle(create_do_something($link));
});

Just found out something, if you have any solution using $("a[href]").click or $("a[href]").on jQuery will create a closure for every found element in the selector.

Running some tests in Chrome and doing a heap snapshot has the following result:

No jQuery and no JS code:

2557 closures

No code at all (just jQuery and jQuery ui):

5832 closures

With the following code

$(document.body).on("click","div"
  ,function(){console.log("hi");});

5834 closures(with 2 divs)

5834 closures(with 100 divs), notice that the amount of closures stays the same

With the following code

$("div").click(function(){console.log("hi");});

5835 closures(with 2 divs)

5933 closures(with 100 divs), notice there are 98 closures more so jQuery adds a closure for you on every found element in the selector.

So why does $("div").click have more closures?

jQuery 1.10.2 unminified on line 4762:

 eventHandle = elemData.handle = function( e ) {

When you set a break point there you'll see jQuery add a closure for each element found in the selector. So $("div") returned a hundred where $(document.body) has one no matter how many divs.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, the code was an oversimplification; I'll change it to make it a little bit clearer. And as I said, I can't make any changes to FooBar, so it can't take the event object. –  Jordan Reiter Nov 13 '13 at 17:04
    
@JordanReiter Missed the fact you can't change FooBar, you can still add the event listener to the container (all anchors would be the document) or not use the .each and add the event listener on $("a[href]") –  HMR Nov 13 '13 at 17:19
    
@JordanReiter I've updated my answer, please let me know if you need any help. –  HMR Nov 15 '13 at 12:20

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