Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to install the Intel OpenMP Runtime on my Linux box in the context of enabling OpenMP support for the clang compiler. I am following the following guide: http://clang-omp.github.io/.

I've gotten to the point where the compiler is built, recognizes -fopenmp, and knows where omp.h is. Now the only thing missing is that it can't find -liomp5, which I assume is the Intel OpenMP runtime. The instructions at the aforementioned website say that I need to do this:

To run (rather than just compile) code you need to get and build an Intel® OpenMP* Runtime Library.

So I downloaded the runtime, and was presented with the following choice of compilers in the readme:

Supported Architectures: IA-32 architecture, Intel(R) 64, and 
Intel(R) Many Integrated Core Architecture

              -----------------------------------------------------------  
              |           icc/icl            |           gcc            |
--------------|------------------------------|--------------------------|
| Linux* OS   |            Yes(1,5)          |         Yes(2,4)         | 
| OS X*       |            Yes(1,3,4)        |          No              |
| Windows* OS |            Yes(1,4)          |          No              |
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

(1) On IA-32 architecture and Intel(R) 64, icc/icl versions 12.x are 
    supported (12.1 is recommended).
(2) gcc version 4.6.2 is supported.
(3) For icc on OS X*, OS X* version 10.5.8 is supported.
(4) Intel(R) Many Integrated Core Architecture not supported.
(5) On Intel(R) Many Integrated Core Architecture, icc/icl versions 13.0 
    or later are required.

Which, unless my reading comprehension skills are worse than I thought, suggest that I can choose to use gcc 4.6.2 for compiling the runtime. Unfortunately, when I proceed to build it, I get:

$ make compiler=gcc
[...]
----- 1/1 --- making lib inc common -----
Build  : 00000000 (development)
check-tools.pl: (!) No "gfortran" found in PATH.
check-tools.pl: (!) No "icc" found in PATH.
check-tools.pl: (!) No "icpc" found in PATH.
check-tools.pl: (!) No "ifort" found in PATH.

../../tools/src/common-checks.mk:59: *** Development tools not found: icc, icpc, ifort.  Stop.

I am really at a loss here. Has anyone had any success using clang-omp, and is this step of building the Intel runtime actually required? I must be really bad at following instructions and it just isn't working out, I need some assistance. Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
gcc is a compiler suite which contains several optional elements, including gfortran. Maybe you should install gfortran? –  Robin Green Nov 12 '13 at 21:46
    
@RobinGreen I just tried and it just prints this: Development tools not found: icc, icpc, ifort. Stop.. And the Intel compiler suite costs a fortune, so I'd be surprised if it was required to build it. –  Thomas Nov 12 '13 at 21:48
    
@RobinGreen You were right. I needed to install gfortran, it works with some modifications. Can you post it as an answer so I can accept it (and maybe it should be put into the readme.. the error message is very misleading). –  Thomas Nov 12 '13 at 21:55
    
There are a couple of ways that you can contact us (the OpenMP runtime team at Intel) directly, which would likely get you a result faster than asking here. Either via software.intel.com/en-us/forums/… or the LLVM OPenmp-dev maillist lists.cs.uiuc.edu/mailman/listinfo/openmp-dev –  Jim Cownie Nov 14 '13 at 14:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The first error message is the key one. You need to install gfortran, which is the optional Fortran compiler that is part of the GNU Compiler Collection (which is what GCC, the project, now stands for - as opposed to gcc, the executable, which is a C compiler).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.