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For Example:

[[1, 2, 3], [2], [1, 2, 3], [5, 6]]

Will generate:

[[1, 2, 3, 5], [1, 2, 3, 6], [3, 2, 1, 5], [3, 2, 1, 6]]

Any lists containing 2 of the same elements are not allowed: i.e [2, 2, 3, 5]

I've tried using itertools.product(*list) to generate a list of all possible combinations and then looking through that list for any lists with duplicates in it, but this is far too cost intensive for my purposes. Anyone got any ideas?

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3  
It’s not clear to me what your criteria are for generating lists. Could you post your inefficient solution, just so we can see more clearly what it is you’re trying to do? –  bdesham Nov 12 '13 at 22:25
    
Why not also [2,3,1,5] or [3,1,2,6]? –  Tim Pietzcker Nov 12 '13 at 22:26
    
The lists must be generated in order i.e you pick an element from the first list, then the second, and so on. (so maybe itertools was a bad idea :D) –  user2985264 Nov 12 '13 at 22:27
    
pick 3 from [1, 2, 3, 5] then 2 from [2], then 1 from [1, 2, 3] then 5 from [5, 6], sorry if im being a little unclear. –  user2985264 Nov 12 '13 at 22:29
    
But you have to pick an element from each list? And you are sure that that will always be possible? –  Tim Pietzcker Nov 12 '13 at 22:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

How about this?

In [34]: var = [[1, 2, 3], [2], [1, 2, 3], [5, 6]]

In [35]: [i for i in itertools.product(*var) if len(i) == len(set(i))]
Out[35]: [(1, 2, 3, 5), (1, 2, 3, 6), (3, 2, 1, 5), (3, 2, 1, 6)]

In [36]: var = [[1,2,3,4], [5]]

In [37]: [i for i in itertools.product(*var) if len(i) == len(set(i))]
Out[37]: [(1, 5), (2, 5), (3, 5), (4, 5)]
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At first glance this seems to work very well, Thanks, I'll test it out more and get back to you. Very clever. –  user2985264 Nov 12 '13 at 22:38
    
Yep, this solution works correctly. Thanks! –  user2985264 Nov 12 '13 at 22:41
    
After your thanks I lost my score :( –  user2390183 Nov 12 '13 at 23:27

You could take the formula for product found in the itertools docs and just add a tweak:

def alt_product(*args, repeat=1):
    # product('ABCD', 'xy') --> Ax Ay Bx By Cx Cy Dx Dy
    # product(range(2), repeat=3) --> 000 001 010 011 100 101 110 111
    pools = [tuple(pool) for pool in args] * repeat
    result = [[]]
    for pool in pools:
        result = [x+[y] for x in result for y in pool if y not in x] #tweak
    for prod in result:
        yield tuple(prod)

demo:

li = [[1, 2, 3], [2], [1, 2, 3], [5, 6]]

list(alt_product(*li))
Out[35]: [(1, 2, 3, 5), (1, 2, 3, 6), (3, 2, 1, 5), (3, 2, 1, 6)]

This is likely to be much friendlier on memory since it does not build a list of all combinations and then filter; instead it filters as it goes.

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