Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I've been following this article which describes how to achieve dependency injection in Scala via the Cake Pattern: http://jonasboner.com/2008/10/06/real-world-scala-dependency-injection-di/

I'm kind of new to Scala and I admit some of it went over my head, so far I've got the following working:

// Setup the component and interface
trait AccountRepositoryComponent {
  val accountRepository: AccountRepositoryInterface

  trait AccountRepositoryInterface {
    def message: String
  }
}

// An implementation
trait MyAccountRepositoryComponent extends AccountRepositoryComponent {
  object AccountRepository extends AccountRepositoryInterface {
    def message: String = "Hello"
  }
}

// Object to configure which implementations to use and retrieve them
object ComponentRegistry extends MyAccountRepositoryComponent {
  val accountRepository = AccountRepository
}

// Example service using the above
object AccountService { 
  val repo = ComponentRegistry.accountRepository
  def say: String = repo.message
}

println(AccountService.say)

What I'm failing to understand is how I would now pass in a fake repository to Account Service, say to change the output to "Test" rather than "Hello"?

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are various ways this could be modified to achieve a workable result, depending on what counts as a workable result for your situation. I'll go through a simpler possibility here.

First, the ComponentRegistry needs to become a trait, so it can be mixed in to the AccountService:

// Trait to configure which component implementations to use and retrieve them
object ComponentRegistry extends MyAccountRepositoryComponent {
  val accountRepository = AccountRepository
}

// Example service using the above
object AccountService extends ComponentRegistry { 
  def say: String = accountRepository.message
}

println(AccountService.say)

This should print "Hello" as before. To set up a test case, add the following:

// Test implementation
trait TestAccountRepositoryComponent extends AccountRepositoryComponent {
  object AccountRepository extends AccountRepositoryInterface {
    def message: String = "Test"
  }
}

// trait to configure test component implementations
trait TestComponentRegistry extends TestAccountRepositoryComponent {
  val accountRepository = AccountRepository
}

Now we can set up a service that uses the test components:

// Example service using the above
object AccountService extends TestComponentRegistry { 
  //val repo = ComponentRegistry.accountRepository
  def say: String = accountRepository.message
}

println(AccountService.say)

This should print "Test".

Note that you would probably want your AccountService to define its functionality in terms of other mixins/traits, which would expect the appropriate components to be available (layered into the "cake"), but wouldn't know which implementation was in use. Eg:

trait CustomerApi {
  self: AccountRepositoryComponent => // Expects an implementation of AccountRepositoryComponent to be mixed in

  def say: String = accountRepository.message
}

Now the method say is implemented without knowing what version of AccountRepository it will interact with, but knowing one must be provided (checked at compile time). So we can write:

object AccountService extends CustomerApi with ComponentRegistry
object TestAccountService extends CustomerApi with TestComponentRegistry

Calling println(AccountService.say) will generate "Hello", while calling println(TestAccountService.say) will generate "Test".

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, so its more mixing in than actual injection? based on this what would be the best way to mock an AccountRepository for a test? (assuming specs2/Mockito) – matthewrk Nov 13 '13 at 14:02
    
Got it, I was attempting to mock an object, if I mock the "Interface" instead it works fine. – matthewrk Nov 13 '13 at 21:47

This post provides a succinct example of that (followed by an interesting alternative).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.