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Let's say I have a user object in user/data:

{"_id": 123, "name": "Bob"}

and users have multiple pets, where a pet document looks like this:

{"_id": 1423, "owner": 123, "type": "cat", "name": "Prince McNugget"}
{"_id": 1830, "owner": 123, "type": "dog", "name": "Tarley"}

What is the right way to (or what are the good options to) perform a fast (ie indexed) search in elastic search to find all pet documents with owner 123?

I've read answers to the "exact-match" question that propose using a mapping where the field is "not_analyzed", but I would assume that a field that is "not_analyzed" isn't indexed, and so the database would have to perform something similar to a full-table scan (I'm comparing to SQL here) to come up with the results. This isn't acceptable for me - I need it to be an indexed search.

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2  
It will be an indexed search. I believe not analyzed means the value is NOT tokenized and stored indexed under multiple ways (eg "new york" -> "new" and "york"). –  mconlin Nov 13 '13 at 0:52
    
Did this work our for you? You should accept the answer if it did work for you or comment if you want more information. –  vaidik Jul 19 '14 at 14:23
    
I'm a bit long out of the elastic search game, and I don't have the time to go back and forth on a problem I don't need solving anymore. I will likely come back to this next time i use elastic search tho –  B T Jul 22 '14 at 21:17

3 Answers 3

You can use term query on pets: http://www.elasticsearch.org/guide/en/elasticsearch/reference/current/query-dsl-term-query.html

{
  "query": {
    "term" : { "owner" : 123 }
  }
}

In ES, everything is indexed unless you config not to index it, so it should be fast by default.

Edit: "not_analyzed" is as what mcollin explained. It just tell ES not to analyze the data (keep data as what we passed), it will still indexed unless you specify "index" : "no".

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I would assume that a field that is "not_analyzed" isn't indexed

That's an easy assumption to make, but also an incorrect one. In ES, 'not_analyzed' means that the data in the field was not split into tokens (analysis). The data is still very much indexed.

The fastest way to search in ES is using filters. From the first Query DSL page:

Filters are very handy since they perform an order of magnitude better than plain queries since no scoring is performed and they are automatically cached.

Since filters are so much faster, the fastest query will nearly always be a filtered query:

{
    "query": {
        "filtered": {
            "query": { 'match_all' : { } },
            "filter": {
                { "term": { "owner": 123 }}
            }
        }
    }
}

As noted on the Filtered Query page, the default query for a Filtered Query is match_all, so this query can be further shortened to:

{
    "query": {
        "filtered": {
            "filter": {
                { "term": { "owner": 123 }}
            }
        }
    }
}

The limitation of filters is that they are boolean. Either documents match the filter exactly or they do not. For performance, it's recommended to constrain as much as possible with filters and then use queries for further matching.

I have built a query builder that parses a HTML form and then submits the search parameters. The builder checks each search param for wildcard characters (? or *) and if they exist, it uses a wildcard query. If not, it adds a filter. I provide UI buttons to make it easy for users to perform exact searches by clicking data. When they uses those, searches hit the filters and are wicked fast. They can also type string* and get what they want, after waiting a few more milliseconds.

Here's a generalized snippet of my query builder:

var filters = [], queries = [];
var searchVal = ..., searchField = ...;

var getWild = function (field, val, boost) {
    var wc = { wildcard: { } };
    wc.wildcard[field] = { value: val, boost: (boost || 1) };
    return wc;
};

if (searchVal) {
    if (/\*|\?/.test(searchVal)) {
        queries.push(getWild(searchField, searchVal);
    }
    else {
        filters.push({ term: {searchField: searchVal}});
    }
}

I use an And filter to constrain all the exact matches (date range, uid constraints, etc) and then the rest of the queries as a filtered -> bool query. It works really well and my little 3-node ES cluster with 133,000,000 documents is plenty fast enough.

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That's great info about filters! –  B T Jul 1 at 19:59
    
Considering that it's the correct answer to the question, "How to perform fast exact-match searches in elasticsearch", what else would an answer need for you to accept it? –  Matt Simerson Jul 1 at 22:50
    
I would want to try it out and make sure it works. Given that I'm no longer working with ES, not sure when i'd be able to get to it. –  B T Jul 2 at 0:53
    
If it gets tons of upvotes tho, i'll probably accept it too –  B T Jul 2 at 0:54

For your use case the relational features of es are interesting. Those allow for queries such as has_parent where you can search for the exact id. Besides that the mentioned term query is correct.

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