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I'm new in C++ programming. And I have to do a Chess game, I have to create Piece(I have classes for all the pieces of the game, using hierarchy) and a Board that has a matrix of objects

       Piece* board[8][8];

I have the Piece class header

       class Piece{
public:        
       Piece(char color1);
       char getColor();
       char getName();

       virtual bool isValid(int row, int col, int rowDest, int colDest, Piece* board[][8]);
private:
    char name;
    char color;

 };

And then I have the Board class header:

class Board{

   public:
    Board();
    ~Board();
            void Board();
            bool ehValido(int,int,int,int,Piece*);

private:
    Piece* board [8][8];
};

And I tried to do the following method for the Board:

Board::Board(){
    Piece* piece;

    for(int i = 0; i < 8; i++)
    {
        for(int j = 0; j < 8; j++)
        {
            if(i = 0 && j = 0) { piece = Rook('B');
            else if(i == 0 && j == 1){ piece = Knight('B'); }
            else if(i == 0 && j == 2){ piece = Bishop('B'); }
            else if(i == 0 && j == 3){ piece = King('B'); }
            else if(i == 0 && j == 4){ piece = Queen('B'); }
            else if(i == 0 && j == 5){ piece = Bishop('B'); }
            else if(i == 0 && j == 6){ piece = Knight('B'); }
            else if(i == 0 && j == 7){ piece = Rook('B'); }
            else if(i == 1) { piece == Pawn('B'); }
            else if(i == 7 && j == 0){ piece = Rook('W'); }
            else if(i == 7 && j == 1){ piece = Knight('W'); }
            else if(i == 7 && j == 2{ piece = Bispo('W'); }
            else if(i == 7 && j == 3){ piece = Queen('W'); }
            else if(i == 7 && j == 4){ piece = King('W'); }
            else if(i == 7 && j == 5){ piece = Bishop('W'); }
            else if(i == 7 && j == 6){ piece = Knight('W'); }
            else if(i == 7 && j == 7){ piece = Rook('W'); }
            else if(i == 6){ piece = Pawn('W'); }
            board[i][j] = piece;

        }
    }
}

And then I tried to print it like this in the main class:

  #include "Piece.h"
  #include "Board.h"

  int main()
  {
     Board t;
     t.show(); //show was created to show the board, probably it's wrong
  }

So, I would like to know how can I print this Board? With all the pieces in the right places. If it's necessary, you can show a completely different solution, I just would like to know a possible answer!

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
In the same way that you have a nested loop to add the pieces. You will use a nested loop to print each piece. On the inner loop you can add a space between each piece. On the outter loop you can add a '\n' for a new line. Then print the entire string. –  Mitch Dart Nov 12 '13 at 22:55
    
Does that even compile? –  Retired Ninja Nov 12 '13 at 23:13
    
Yes, it does compile! –  murilo Nov 13 '13 at 0:28

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