Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to find in a set of files the exact mach of a line hello world. For instance, let's say test1.txt and test2.txt are all the .txt in the folder, and test1.txt is:

hello world
a hello world

and test2.txt is:

hello world b
helloworld
hello world
hello world

I would expect 3 as return for hello world. But what I know is grep -l "hello world" *.txt | wc -l, which doesn't work well.

Could anyone help?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

grep -Fcx 'hello world'

should do it. For multiple input files, use

cat *.txt | grep -Fcx 'hello world'

This way, the cat combines the files into one input stream for grep, providing a global count.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I just realized that I want to look for in a set of files, updated my OP... –  SoftTimur Nov 13 '13 at 0:46
    
@SoftTimur See my updated answer. –  user2719058 Nov 13 '13 at 0:56
    
it gives me bash: *.*: ambiguous redirect –  SoftTimur Nov 13 '13 at 0:58
    
@SoftTimur: Ugh, indeed. A redirection < *.txt works in zsh, but not in bash. Fixed. –  user2719058 Nov 13 '13 at 1:08
    
Sorry, I don't know if you tested on your side... It always return 0 for me... –  SoftTimur Nov 13 '13 at 1:14
grep -x -c "hello world" test.txt

that will give you 2 as a result.

and if you want to know what lines your hits can be found on, you can use

grep -n -x "hello world" test.txt
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I just realized that I want to look for in a set of files, updated my OP... –  SoftTimur Nov 13 '13 at 0:46

grep has the special characters '^' to match the beginning of the line, and '$' to match the end, so if you do:

grep "^hello world$" *.txt

You will get the lines you are looking for, and you can add a "| wc -l" for the count, or concatenate the lines and use the -c option to grep (as someone above suggested).

share|improve this answer

grep is generally the best and fastest tool for this, but for the record, if you want a pure bash method, you could do:

$ { c=0; while IFS='' read -r line; do [ "$line" = "hello world" ] && ((c++)); done; echo $c; } < test.txt 
2
$ 

A comment asks "Why unset IFS?". Consider what happens if we have whitespace at the beginning or end of a line (I assume from the question, we want an exact match, so the extra whitespace should cause the match to fail):

$ echo " hello world" | { c=0; while read -r line; do [ "$line" = "hello world" ] && ((c++)); done; echo $c; }
1
$ echo " hello world" | { c=0; while IFS='' read -r line; do [ "$line" = "hello world" ] && ((c++)); done; echo $c; }
0
$ 

If IFS is set, then read will split the line according to IFS and then assign the resulting tokens to variables. Since we have whitespace at the beginning, then this is treated as a separator and is effectively discarded.


In fact if we use the builtin variable $REPLY, we don't need to worry about IFS at all. So:

{ c=0; while read -r; do [ "$REPLY" = "hello world" ] && ((c++)); done; echo $c; } < test.txt
share|improve this answer
    
Why unset IFS? Otherwise, nice effort :) –  user2719058 Nov 13 '13 at 1:04
    
@user2719058 - please see my edit –  DigitalTrauma Nov 13 '13 at 1:16
    
Ah, good catch. Well done. –  user2719058 Nov 13 '13 at 1:20
find . -name "you want file patterns" | xargs grep -x "hello world" | wc -l

In your situation, the desired command is:

find . -name "*.txt" | xargs grep -x "hello world" | wc -l
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.