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Video 308 on WWDC 2013 says "link your libraries statically" when explaining how to validate purchase receipts, to prevent someone (hacker) from swapping the validation library with another library that validates everything.

In terms of practical steps in Xcode what does this "link your libraries statically" mean?


EDIT


Ok, I know what a static libraries are and how you link them. My doubt here is that their phrase is reversed. Instead of saying "add your code as a static library" or "link to your static library", they said "link statically to your code". This sounded to me as something different. I am just trying to confirm that this is the same thing as simply linking against a static library.

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I got something useful from apple dev center, developer.apple.com/library/ios/technotes/iOSStaticLibraries/… maybe it helps you –  Noval Agung Prayogo Nov 13 '13 at 0:47

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

What it means is very easy. It about dragging and dropping the library to your project. Then going to build_phases -> link_binary_with_libraries and adding the library there.

See this example of static linking with StackMob.

enter image description here

Hope this helps!

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Ok, I know what a static libraries are and how you link them. My doubt is that their phrase is reversed. Instead of saying "add your code as a static library" or "link to your static library", they said "link statically to your code". This sounded to me as something different. Are you sure that both terms are the same thing? –  SpaceDog Nov 13 '13 at 0:59
    
I believe so. I think all of those phrases mean the same thing. –  LuisCien Nov 13 '13 at 1:05
    
thanks!!!!!!!!!!!!! –  SpaceDog Nov 13 '13 at 1:28

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