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If I have the string "2.5 4.2 6.9 1.1", how can I convert that into a vector of doubles as efficiently as possible?

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3 Answers 3

vector<double> convert_string_to_vec(std::string const & str)
{
    std::istringstream input{str};
    vector<double> output{std::istream_iterator<double>{input},
                          std::istream_iterator<double>{}};

    return output;
}

You'll need to include <sstream> as well as <iterator> for this to work. Here's a working example.

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2  
You need to either use universal initialization, {}, or stuff one of those iterators (ideally the first) in a nested set of parens, or you code will hit an MVP. And minor: your decl is missing a semi-colon. –  WhozCraig Nov 13 '13 at 0:48
    
There ya go. +1 –  WhozCraig Nov 13 '13 at 0:53
    
Got to hate that mvp... Changed them all to universal initialization and added link to coliru example. thanks craig =) –  Raphael Miedl Nov 13 '13 at 0:54
1  
You can always use named iterators, which you can declare in the same statement, avoiding mvp and saving you from having to tediously type std::istream_iterator<double> twice. coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/dca982f0429e3595 –  Benjamin Lindley Nov 13 '13 at 1:18
1  
@traal: In a world with RVO and move semantics, no, it really can't. At least, not in that respect. There may be optimization opportunities in the string-to-double conversion though. –  Benjamin Lindley Nov 13 '13 at 1:24

This is how I would generally do it. Possibly not the most efficient way, but very simple.

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

int main()
{
    std::string d("2.5 4.2 6.9 1.1");
    std::stringstream s(d);
    std::vector<double> result;
    double temp;
    while(s >> temp)
    {
        result.push_back(temp);
    }
    for(size_t i = 0; i < result.size(); ++i)
    {
        std::cout << result[i] << "\n";
    }

    return 0;
}
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is there a specific reason for not using std::endl but rather using "\n" ? –  Varaquilex Nov 13 '13 at 0:52
1  
@Volkanİlbeyli std::endl flushes the stream as well as inserting a new line. There's no need to flush after each iteration so '\n' is preferred in this case. –  0x499602D2 Nov 13 '13 at 0:53
    
Yeah, the "\n" is to avoid extra flushing of the stream. Admittedly not all that important in a small example like this, but I'm trying to teach myself to prefer it for when there is a difference. –  Retired Ninja Nov 13 '13 at 0:58

Here's a unique way:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>

template <class Facet>
struct erasable_facet : Facet
{
    erasable_facet() : Facet(0) { }
    ~erasable_facet() { }
};

std::vector<double> convert(const std::string& str)
{
    using num_get = std::num_get<char>;

    erasable_facet<num_get> facet;

    std::stringbuf buf(str);
    std::vector<double> v;

    std::ios ios(nullptr);
    std::ios_base::iostate err = std::ios_base::goodbit;

    double d;
    std::istreambuf_iterator<char> it, end;

    do
    {
        it = facet.get(&buf, end, ios, err, d);
        buf.sbumpc(); // skip space

        if (!(err & std::ios_base::failbit) &&
            !(err & std::ios_base::badbit))
            v.push_back(d);
        else
            return v;
    } while (it != end);

    return v;
}

int main()
{
    std::string str = "1.24 5.32 9.53";

    auto v = convert(str);
}
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