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Four Vectors

import numpy as np
class FourVector:
""" This document is a demonstration of how to create a class of Four vector """
    def __init__(self,ct=0,x=0,y=0,z=0):
        self.a=(ct,x,y,z)
        self.r=(ct,r=[x,y,z])

P0 = FourVector()
print P0.a

P1 = FourVector(ct=9,x=1,y=2,z=4)
print P1.a

P2 = FourVector(ct=99.9,r=[1,2,4])

My code is working fine for P0, P1 but doesn't work for P2 :( Can anyone spot my mistake?

share|improve this question
1  
Your code shouldn't even compile. What do you expect self.r=(ct,r=[x,y,z]) to do? –  user2357112 Nov 13 '13 at 2:05
1  
As for P2, what do you expect passing an r argument to the constructor to do when your constructor doesn't take an argument with that name? –  user2357112 Nov 13 '13 at 2:06
    
To user: Arihh, yes you are right. To Bi Rico: Numpy array –  el psy Congroo Nov 13 '13 at 2:17
    
Please, avoid posting text as an image; next time, do a copy & paste of the text instead of providing a screenshot. –  Matteo Italia Nov 13 '13 at 2:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You don't have a r parameter in your __init__ method:

class FourVector:
    def __init__(self, ct = 0, x = 0, y = 0, z = 0, r = None):
        self.a = (ct, x, y, z)
        if r is not None:
            self.a = (ct, r[0], r[1], r[2])

P0 = FourVector()
print P0.a

P1 = FourVector(ct = 9, x = 1, y = 2, z = 4)
print P1.a

P2 = FourVector(ct = 99.9, r = [1, 2, 4])
print P2.a
share|improve this answer
1  
cool you are genius! –  el psy Congroo Nov 13 '13 at 2:20
    
I was struggling to create another layer... " like what you did above, by stating r!=[] Flexibly using if statement, I'm a true newbie in programming, just need more practice! –  el psy Congroo Nov 13 '13 at 2:22
    
if r != [] means "if you passed a parameter r to __init__" –  Christian Nov 13 '13 at 2:23
2  
Note that this isn't a correct solution to the assignment. The space components are supposed to be stored in a numpy array. Also, it's a bad idea to have a mutable default argument, even if you don't happen to mutate it. That said, this solves the immediate bug. –  user2357112 Nov 13 '13 at 2:24
    
Yipes, I see stackoverflow.com/q/1132941/1730674 –  askewchan Nov 13 '13 at 2:31

r isn't even in the argument list, why? Just add it:

def __init__(self,ct=0,x=0,y=0,z=0, r=None)
share|improve this answer
    
Careful: stackoverflow.com/q/1132941/1730674 –  askewchan Nov 13 '13 at 2:34
    
Ah, yes. I know that –  aIKid Nov 13 '13 at 2:35
    
:) but OP probably doesn't yet :P –  askewchan Nov 13 '13 at 2:37
    
No, i don't feel a need to mention it, since __init__ is a special method that will be called only once, when the class is instantiated. –  aIKid Nov 13 '13 at 3:06
1  
@aIKid: Wrong. __init__ will be called to instantiate each instance, and each instance will share the same default list for r. This kind of thing is why you don't use a mutable default argument, even if you think it should be safe. –  user2357112 Nov 13 '13 at 3:31
import numpy as np

class FourVector:
""" This document is a demonstration of how to create a class of Four vector """
    def __init__(self, ct=0, x=0, y=0, z=0, r=[]):
        self.ct = ct
        self.r =  np.array(r if r else [x,y,z])


P0 = FourVector()
print P0.r

P1 = FourVector(ct = 9, x = 1, y = 2, z = 4)
print P1.r

P2 = FourVector(ct = 99.9, r = [1, 2, 4])
print P2.r
share|improve this answer
    
It's probably better to use None for the default argument r, so you don't accidentally modify the list and get weird bugs. –  user2357112 Nov 13 '13 at 2:22
    
This is what @user2357112 is referring to: stackoverflow.com/q/1132941/1730674 –  askewchan Nov 13 '13 at 2:33
    
\@askewchan Don't we avoid this issue since 'r' is defined on class initialization? I may be missing something, and all else equal, using r=None in the code I provided works just fine, and if there's a non-zero chance to create bugs due to something unknown to me, I'll start using None defaults. Thanks. –  trstowell Nov 13 '13 at 20:11

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