Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to create a one dimensional array and use a random number generator(Gaussian generator that generates a random number with means of 70 and a standard deviation of 10) to populate the array with at least 100 numbers between 0 and 100 inclusive.

How would i go about doing this in C++?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

In C++11 this is relatively straight forward using the random header and std::normal_distribution (live example):

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <string>
#include <map>
#include <random>

int main()
{
    std::random_device rd;

    std::mt19937 e2(rd());

    std::normal_distribution<> dist(70, 10);

    std::map<int, int> hist;
    for (int n = 0; n < 100000; ++n) {
        ++hist[std::round(dist(e2))];
    }

    for (auto p : hist) {
        std::cout << std::fixed << std::setprecision(1) << std::setw(2)
                  << p.first << ' ' << std::string(p.second/200, '*') << '\n';
    }
}

If C++11 is not an option than boost also provides a library(live example):

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <string>
#include <map>
#include <random>
#include <boost/random.hpp>
#include <boost/random/normal_distribution.hpp>

int main()
{

  boost::mt19937 *rng = new boost::mt19937();
  rng->seed(time(NULL));

  boost::normal_distribution<> distribution(70, 10);
  boost::variate_generator< boost::mt19937, boost::normal_distribution<> > dist(*rng, distribution);

  std::map<int, int> hist;
  for (int n = 0; n < 100000; ++n) {
    ++hist[std::round(dist())];
  }

  for (auto p : hist) {
    std::cout << std::fixed << std::setprecision(1) << std::setw(2)
              << p.first << ' ' << std::string(p.second/200, '*') << '\n';
  }
}

and if for some reason neither of these options is possible then you can roll your own Box-Muller transform, the code provided in the link looks reasonable.

share|improve this answer

Use the Box Muller distribution (from here):

double rand_normal(double mean, double stddev)
{//Box muller method
    static double n2 = 0.0;
    static int n2_cached = 0;
    if (!n2_cached)
    {
        double x, y, r;
        do
        {
            x = 2.0*rand()/RAND_MAX - 1;
            y = 2.0*rand()/RAND_MAX - 1;

            r = x*x + y*y;
        }
        while (r == 0.0 || r > 1.0);
        {
            double d = sqrt(-2.0*log(r)/r);
            double n1 = x*d;
            n2 = y*d;
            double result = n1*stddev + mean;
            n2_cached = 1;
            return result;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        n2_cached = 0;
        return n2*stddev + mean;
    }
}

you can read more at: wolframe math world

share|improve this answer

With #include <random>

std::default_random_engine de(time(0)); //seed
std::normal_distribution<int> nd(70, 10); //mean followed by stdiv
int rarrary [101]; // [0, 100]
for(int i = 0; i < 101; ++i){
    rarray[i] = nd(de); //Generate numbers;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Now, i get the error: [Error] 'default_random_engine' is not a member of 'std' –  coder_For_Life22 Nov 13 '13 at 2:55

In C++11 you would use the facilities provided by the <random> header; create a random engine (e.g. std::default_random_engine or std::mt19937, initialized with std::random_device if necessary) and a std::normal_distribution object initialized with your parameters; then you can use them together to generate your numbers. Here you can find a full example.

In previous versions of C++, instead, all you have is the "classic" C LCG (srand/rand), which just generates a plain integer distribution in the range [0, MAX_RAND]; with it you can still generate gaussian random numbers using the Box-Muller transform (which is what actually the C++11 std::normal_distribution does internally).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.