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Is it possible to instantiate object member variables in the class' methods, besides the constructor. I want to do this without using pointers because I'm trying to make my code use more stack memory. (My professor said so)

I have looked this up before, and the closest thing I found was extern. That sounds kind of dirty, and I'm not sure if that's exactly what I'm looking for.

This is what I'm trying to do, and I'm trying to do it without pointers:

class A
{
    private:
        B var;
    public:
        A();
        void setVar();
};

A::A()
{
}

void A::setVar()
{
    var = B(1,2);
}

class B
{
    public:
        B();
        B(int a, int b);
};

B::B()
{
}

B::B(int a, int b)
{
}
share|improve this question
    
If this is not possible should B just have a setup method? –  user1932934 Nov 13 '13 at 4:00
    
Have you looked at class initializer lists? –  Bruce Dean Nov 13 '13 at 4:03
    
Yes, but I think they are only for constructors. –  user1932934 Nov 13 '13 at 4:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Member variables that are not pointers will automatically be created on the stack when you create your object on the stack. (That is they'll be part of your object on the stack.) You can initialize them to specific values in the object's constructor in at least 2 ways:

A::A() : var (1,2)
{
}

or

A::A()
{
    var = B (1,2);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Does your second option work for non constructors? –  user1932934 Nov 13 '13 at 4:05
    
Yes, it would. Once the object is allocated on the stack, all of its non-pointer member variables are there on the stack with it, regardless of when or where you initialize them. If you don't initialize them, they may have junk values in them, though, so you don't generally want to leave them uninitialized after the constructor if you can help it. –  user1118321 Nov 13 '13 at 4:36
    
I just tried this and it thought I was calling a method called B. I don't think it works :(. –  user1932934 Nov 13 '13 at 4:43
    
Did you include the definition of the class B in the code you compiled? –  user1118321 Nov 13 '13 at 5:30
    
Yes I made sure to include it. I am also using C++11. I will try it out in another project. –  user1932934 Nov 13 '13 at 6:24

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